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    Senior Member rialisha06's Avatar
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    Talking to learn arabic by songs....

    Hi to all i saw this in a web page to learn arabic by songs translating songs and understanding the meaning and rules is an idea can u guys give a opinion about that... i notice all here like arabic music and ask for translations i think this can be a nice and fun way to learn.
    this is a example :
    Egyptian arabic alphabeth


    There's no way I can put Arabic orthography lessons on the site. The only way to learn the alphabet is to practice and memorize. But I'll give a run down of the sounds of Egyptian Arabic using words commonly found in Arabic music.

    ا - alif, as in "Ah" آه which means "ow," like an expression of pain or frustration

    ب - ba, as in "Bahebbak" بحبك which means "I love you"

    ت - ta, as in "Tani" تاني which means "another" or "again"

    ث - ta or sa, as in "Sawani" ثواني which means "seconds" from the same word as "tani." While this letter in Standard Arabic is a "tha," it has merged with the letters "ta" and "siin" now. For old and common words "ta" is more common, and from new, borrowed, or reborrowed wor.ds "sa" is more likely.

    ج - giim, as in "Gameel" جميل which means "beautiful." In Egypt, it is usually pronounced as a "ga" as opposed to the Standard Arabic "ja."

    ح - Ha (7a), as in "Habibi" حبيبي which means "my darling." This sound does not exist in English, but it is like a regular Ha in English only "harsher." A friend has described it to me as a "phone sex 'h'"

    خ - xa (5a or kha), as in "Khudni" خدني which means "take me." This sound is like kinda the ch in Bach from german, the french 'r' in "quatre" or to an English speaker probably sounds like they are about to spit

    د - daal, as in "Dunya" دنيا which can mean "the world," "the prevailing environment" or "everyone."

    ذ - daal or zaal, as in "Dayeb" ذائب which means "melting" often in love. Like "tha," "dhaal" loses its standard Arabic pronunciation, becoming a "da" sound for old and common words and a "za" sound for newer, borrowed, or reborrowed words from Standard Arabic.

    ر - ra, as in "Rooh" روح which means "soul." It is trilled like the Spanish r.

    ز - zay, as in "Zaman" زمن which means "time" as in the 4th dimension

    س - sin, as in "Sawa" سوا which means "together"

    ش - shiin, as in "Shuf" شوف which means "see," "look," or "look at"

    ص - Saad, as in "Sabr" صبر which means "patience." The Saad is like an English s but with more rounding of the lips to produce a deeper hiss.

    ض - Daad, as in "Da3" ضاع which means "lost" or "wasted." Daad is like the English d in the same relationship as Saad is to s.

    ط - Ta (6a), as in "Tayr" طير which means "bird." Ta is in the same relationship with the English T as Daad is with d

    ظ - Da or Za, as in "Zalim" ظالم which means "unjust" or "oppressive." This sound is DHa in Standard Arabic, but either becomes a "Za" sound or a "Da" sound in Egyptian.

    ع - Ayn (3ayn), as in "3ayni" عيني which means "my eye" (a very common term of endearment in Arabic). 3ayn has no equivalent in English and I don't know how to describe it. Just read and listen for it. For those who know linguistics, its the voiced version of ح

    غ - ghayn, as in "Ghali" غالي which means "precious." It's like a ga sound only it's like you're gargling water.

    ف - fa, as in "Farah" فرح which means "joy" or "happiness"

    ق - qaff (9aff, 2aff), as in "Qalbi" قلبي which means "my heart." Originally this sound is like an English k only deeper in the throat, as if you were choking, but in Egypt it is usually pronounced as a glottal stop like the sound in between Uh and Oh in Uh-Oh. So "Qalbi" becomes "Albi."

    ك - kaff (Chaff), as in "Keef" كيف which means "how" east of Egypt.

    ل - laam, as in "Leel" ليل which means "night"

    م - miim, as in "Majnun" مجنون which means "mad" or "crazy"

    ن - nuun, as in "Nar" نار which means "fire"

    ه - ha, as in "Hawa" هوى which is one of the many words for love "hawa"

    و - waaw, as in "Waheshtini" وحشتيني which is how you tell a girl "I miss you"

    ي - ya, as in "Ya habibi" يا حبيبي which means "oh my darling." To address someone like "oh" or "hey" in English, you say "ya" before the name or title you are calling them.

    New Vocabulary for the song of 'Samira Said ' Ma khalas 'That's it'



    xalaaS (خلاص) - that's it
    3aayiz (عايز) - want
    faakir (فاكر) - remembering
    taani (تاني) - again, another
    bit'uul (بتقول) - you say
    bititkallim (بتتكلّم) - to talk
    eh (ايه) - what?
    mish (مش) - not
    illi (اللي) - which, that, that which

    gah (جه) - to come
    gaab (جاب) - to bring
    ba3ad (بعد) - to get far away, to go away
    nasa (نسى) - to forget
    ba'a (بقى) - to be, to become, to get
    3amal (عمل) - to do

    For those who are familiar with Standard Arabic or a dialect of Arabic other than Egyptian, this song is ideal for illustrating many of the basic aspects of Egyptian Arabic that can be challenging if you have no experience with the dialect. However, if you learn a few basic points about Egyptian colloquial you will find that is it not so different from the version of Arabic that you know.

    Pop music is one of the portals to the world of spoken Arabic. Music of the Arabic-speaking world is typically sung in dialects as opposed to Standard Arabic, and many singers regardless of origin sing in Egyptian dialect of Cairo due to the size of the Egyptian market and the relative familiarity that people have with this dialect. The song "ma xalaaS (ما خلاص)" by Samira Said is a case in point. Samira Said was born in Morocco but has since moved to Egypt to become one of the more successful pop artists in the Arab world today. The song's title, "ma xalaaS (ما خلاص)," contains the very common word "xalaaS (خلاص)," which means "that's it," or "it's over." It has both the connotations as "that's all" and "it's done" just like the phrase "that's it" in English. This word is not explicitly Egyptian but can be found much more in colloquial speech because saying "that's it" is a very idiomatic aspect of speech not found in written Arabic. The "ما" adds emphasis to the phrase to the effect of "it's soooo over" or something along those lines.

    Listen to the song and enjoy this video. The complete lyrics are listed below the video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HdnbQ315Yc


    سميرة سعيد - ما خلاص

    ما خلاص عايز ايه منى ايه
    ابعد بقى عنى ايه
    حاول تفهمنى الماضى خلاص انساه

    ما خلاص ايه جابك تانى ايه
    ارتاح وانسانى ايه
    واللى هييجى منك والله مانيش عايزاه

    بتقول انا كنت زمان بهواك
    بصراحه انا مش فاكراك
    وبتتكلم عن ايه

    ماخلاص راحت يا حبيبى عليك
    عايز تحلم خليك
    وعايزنى اعملك ايه

    يا سلام بتحايل في ايه
    وبتحلم بي ليه
    لا اهدى شويه
    ده خيالك راح لبعيد

    وبلاش يخطر على بالك لا
    ان انا راجعالك لا
    ما تشوف بقى حالك
    ده كلامك مش هيفيد

    انت اللى بالبعد بادى
    ودلوقتى عادى انى اقسى عليك
    كل اللى هاين علي تشوفك عيني ولا تحن ليك


    Even if you have lots of Arabic knowledge, you may not have understood much if you are unfamiliar with the Egyptian dialect. Don't worry, there are only some minor differences that interfere with your understanding of the song. Here I will explain line by line the first verse of the song and the chorus. The first line is as follows:


    ما خلاص عايز ايه منى


    The word "3aayiz (عايز)" follows the familiar pattern of (فاعل) from Standard Arabic, thus making it a kind of active participle carrying the meaning of a present tense verb in this case. So "3aayiz (عايز)" means "wanting," which depending on the context could be "I want," "you want," or "he wants." It takes the place of the standard Arabic verb "أراد," which does not exist as such in Egyptian Arabic. The word "eh (ايه)" is Egyptian for "what," taking the place of both "ما" and "ماذا" from Standard Arabic. As you can see the question word "eh" follows the verb "3aayiz" instead of preceding it. This is a particular characteristic of Egyptian Arabic; the question word almost always is found after the verb and usually at the end of the sentence. From context we infer that the phrase "3aayiz eh? (عايز ايه؟)" means "what do you want?" The last word of the sentence "minni (منى)" is the same as Standard Arabic "from me," but the reader may be confused to see a "ى" in place of the "ي." This is usually the case at the end of the word in Egyptian Arabic so you just have to get used to it. In all, the first sentence means "it's over, what do you want from me?" This may seem to be a lot of explaining for just one line of a song, but it's already illustrated several essential basics of Egyptian Arabic.

    If we move to the next line:


    ابعد بقى عنى


    We find the word "ib3ad (ابعد)" meaning "get away!" or literally "go farther away." The next word "ba'a (بقى)" may sound strange, but actually it is the same word as the Standard Arabic verb "بقي" which means "to remain" or "to stay." The pronunciation is different because in Egyptian Arabic the "qaaf (ق)" is usually pronounced as a glottal stop, the equivalent of "hamza (ء)" in Standard Arabic. While the verb retains some aspect of its meaning "to remain," it is much more versatile and idiomatic in colloquial, taking on the connotations sometimes of the verb "to get" like "get away!" or also the verb "to be." Here it comes as a command, coupled with the verb "ib3ad 3anni (ابعد عني)" with the general meaning of "get away from me." "ba'a" is not easy to translate in Egyptian Arabic but know that it has the general connotations of "to be" but not always in the same sense.

    The next line:


    حاول تفهمنى الماضى خلاص انساه


    Should not be terribly difficult for the Standard Arabic knower. "Haawal (حاول)" is the command "try" and "tifhamni (تفهمني)" means "you understand me," altogether meaning "try to understand me." Notice that the verbs are not bridged by the connector word "an (أنْ)" as in Standard Arabic. This word does not exist in colloquial and is not necessary. "al-maaDi xalaaS insaah (الماضي خلاص انساه) of course means "the past is over, forget it." Pay attention to the pronunciation of "insaah" and note the the direct object particle for "it" has no vowel after it. In colloquial all case markings have been dropped from words so they are not pronounced.

    The following line:


    ما خلاص ايه جابك تانى


    May appear strange but is actually not very different from the basic standard Arabic that any beginner would know. The verb "gaabak (جابك)" is comprised of the verb "gaab (جاب)" and the direct object marker for you (masculine) "ak (ك)." For you (feminine) the marker would be "ik." Notice that in Egyptian dialect the "jiim (ج)" is pronounced as an English "g" sound. This is always the case, except for in a select few verbs imported from other languages containing a "j" sound. So the verb "gaab (جاب)" actually comes from the Standard Arabic "جاء ب" meaning to "come with" but really "to bring." When she says "eh gaabak? (ايه جابك؟)," we can now say that this means "what brought you?" "taani (تاني)" is the same as Standard Arabic "ثاني" meaning "second." The "thaa (ث)" is not pronounced in Egyptian Arabic. It usually becomes a "ta" in common words or older words, but newer words re-imported from standard or the outside usually us the "sa" pronunciation in place of "tha." "taani (تاني)" has many meanings in colloquial including "second," but in this case it means again. Hence, the line means "what brought you (to me or here) again?"

    The next line is fairly straighforward:


    ارتاح وانسانى


    "irtaaH (ارتاح)" is a very common verb in Egyptian colloquial meaning "to be comfortable" or "to be at ease" or "to relax" or "to be content," maybe even "to take it easy" in the sense of "to calm down." Here she commands her ex-lover "irtaaH wa insaani (ارتاح وانساني)" to the effect of "relax and forget me," or something along these lines.

    By contrast, the following line may not appear to even be Arabic, but when dissected you will see that it is in principle the same:


    واللى هييجى منك والله مانيش عايزاه


    "illi (اللى)" is actually the same word as the standard "الذي," except it is not conjugated for gender or number. It means "which" or "that which." "hayiigi (هييجي)" is comprised of "ha (ه sometimes ح)" which is the future marker similar to "sa (س)" in Standard Arabic and the verb "yiigi (ييجي)" which of course means "he/it comes." Notice that the "hamza (ء)" has once again been dropped and a long vowel "ي" has been inserted before the "giim" for ease of pronunciation. Put it all together and "illi hayiigi minnak (اللي هييجي منك)" means "that which will come/is coming from you." This could be what he is going to say or what he is going to bring or do. The second part of the line contains the very familiar phrase "wallahi (ولله)" meaning "I swear" or "I swear to God." "maaniish (مانيش)" sounds crazy, but actually is the equivalent of Standard Arabic "lastu (لست)" meaning "I'm not" or "I don't." It is comprised of "ma (ما)" meaning not, "ana (انا)" meaning "I," and the "sh (ش)" at the end. This "maa -x- sh" combination is used often for negation in Egyptian Arabic, and especially with verbs. This way of expressing "I'm not" can be used for all other pronouns as well. Finally, "3ayzaah" can be seen to be comprised of the now familiar "3aayiz (عايز)," only this time conjugated for feminine, and the direct object "ah (ه)" referring to the aforementioned "اللى هييجي منك." In total the sentence is revealed thusly to mean "and that which will come from you, I swear to God, I don't want it."

    That's a lot of work for one little verse of a song. Now let's move on to the chorus:


    بتقول انا كنت زمان بهواك


    "bit'uul (بتقول)" is the equivalent of Standard Arabic "تقول" meaning "you say." Once again we see the the "q" becoming a glottal stop sound like "hamza." The "b- (ب)" is added to the beginning of verbs in the present tense verbs in Egyptian Colloquial Arabic. But what does he say you ask? "ana kunt zamaan bahwaak (انا كنت زمان بهواك)" means "I used to love you at one time" or "I used to love you in the past." "zamaan (زمان)" means time but here means "a time" that is now past. "bahwaak (بهواك)" is of course the combination of present tense marker "b- (ب)" and the verb "ahwaak (اهواك)" meaning "I love you." "ana kunt (انا كنت)" means "I was," just like in Standard Arabic, giving the meaning here of "I used to." What we notice here, however, is we do not know exactly what this means. After "bit'uul" there is no "inn (إنّ)" like in standard Arabic. We don't know if she is saying that he said the quote "I used to love you" or she says that he says that she used to love him. Here we infer the latter because it is he who wants her back, but still the grammatical ambiguity remains.

    The next line:


    بصراحه انا مش فاكراك


    Here we find one of the most important words in colloquial Egyptian, "mish." She says "ana mish fakraak (انا مش فاكراك)," meaning "I don't remember you." We already saw "maaniish (مش)" meaning "I'm not" and here is another variation. "mish (مش)" means "not" and is the equivalent of standard Arabic "ليس," but actually, is not conjugated for person or number. Thus "ana mish," "anta mish" and so forth. "fakraak (فاكراك)" is comprised of "faakir (فاكر)" the participle form once again meaning "to remember," and the direct object marker for "you." This literally means "remembering you" but in the discourse of love it has the connations of "thinking of you" or "still being in love," juxtaposed with "naasi (ناسي)" which means "forgetting" or "no longer loving." Altogether the line "bi-SaraaHa ana mish fakraak (بصراحة انا مش فاكراك)" means "quite frankly, I'm not remembering you," and while not easily translated the meaning is clear, she's done with him!

    The next line may be easily understood now:


    وبتتكلم عن ايه


    We see "b- (ب)" + "titkallam (تتكلّم)" meaning "you are talking." This verb is the same as in Standard Arabic, but make note of the stress difference in the word "titkallam" vs. "tatakallam." Also we can see she says "bititkallam 3an eh? (بتتكلم عن ايه؟)," meaning "what are you talking about?"

    The next line contains a useful colloquial idiom:


    ماخلاص راحت يا حبيبى عليك


    "raaHat (راحت)" is from the verb "raaH (راح)," which means "to go" or "to leave." This verb is sometimes found in standard Arabic but is more common in colloquial Arabic, completely replacing the verb Standard Arabic verb "ذهب," which for all intents and purposes does not exist in Egyptian Arabic. Samira says "raaHat ya Habiibi 3aleek (راحت يا حبيبى عليك)," meaning "you've lost it and you will never get it back" or "it's gone for good." Of course "raaHat 3aleek (راحت عليك)" literally means something like "it left on you" but just know the idiomatic meaning of this phrase. So the whole line means something like "it's over, it's gone for good."

    The next line:


    عايز تحلم خليك


    Here "3aayiz taHlam (عايز تحلم)" meanings "you want to dream," however, we can see from context that it is a question, something like "you wanna dream?" "xalliik (خليك)" is a very important colloquial word, meaning "let you," or "may you." "xalla (خلى)" can be attached to any noun to mean "let (someone/something) be/do (something)." For example "xalliini a3iish (خليني اعيش)" means "let me live." In this case "xalliik" means "may you" like "go ahead." So, the whole line altogether means "you wanna dream? may you" or "you wanna dream? go ahead."

    The last line of the chorus:


    وعايزني أعمل لك ايه؟


    Contains the familiar standard Arabic verb "عمل." However, this verb does not mean "to work" in colloquial, but rather, "to do" replacing standard Arabic "فعل." Thus when Samira says "3aayizni a3mal lak eh? (عايزني أعمل لك ايه؟)" it means "what do you want me to do for you?"

    So, we can see that in Egyptian colloquial some letters have a different pronunciation and some words have different but related meanings. Other words have been completely replaced by new words specific to the dialect. Also, we can see that question words tend to be found at the end of the sentence as opposed to the beginning. Negation has been changed and simplified, and verbs have different tense markers. However, despite these myriad differences, the core vocabulary and structure of the language remains the same. Listen again and try to understand the second half of the song as well, see how much you've learned. Probably close to nothing, right! That's because there's still lots to learn about Egyptian Arabic.

    If ur guys agree we can do one or two songs in a week..
    thanks

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  3. #2
    Senior Member citlalli's Avatar
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    Rialisha:

    I don't want to be nosy or rude, but I've been working with a website with exactly the same material for a few months now, and as far as I know the guy who did that page is the one who's been doing all the hard work in trying to explain the egyptian accent to non arabic speakers.

    I reckon that your intention is good and you just want to share this with more people, but I also think that the other guy deserves some credit for his effort.

    Here's the link to his website (Lesson 1: Ma khalas by Samira Said):

    http://egyptianarabiccourse.blogspot...esson-one.html

    PS I posted the link to this site a few months ago in the thread "learn arabic easily with Maviii".
    “If cats looked like frogs we'd realize what nasty, cruel little bastards they are. Style. That's what people remember.” ― Terry Pratchett.

  4. #3
    Senior Member rialisha06's Avatar
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    Dear Citalli i say clearly that i take for another website the intention to post this is because i want all the people in this forum who speak arabic help the others like me who dont know this languague and want learn by here i dont want the guys give me a credit for this for the site i found im not want to take credit posting this or make the persosn who did it in the page u posted less credit all people here know that i dont speak arabic or write i want take this as an example and we can do same in here to learn...i hope u understand what i trying to say...

    Hi to all i saw this in a web page to learn arabic by songs translating songs and understanding the meaning and rules is an idea can u guys give a opinion about that... i notice all here like arabic music and ask for translations i think this can be a nice and fun way to learn.
    this is a example :
    EXAMPLE I SAY CLEARLY....



    this is what i say/

  5. #4
    Senior Member citlalli's Avatar
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    Rialisha:

    No need tu use aggresive tones... I missed the line where you mentioned you saw this in another website; I'm sorry. I hope you understand I didn't do it as a personal attack on you, but only out of principle and coz I felt rather awkward.

    I hope we all will one day master the arabic language... Greetings, Leyla.
    “If cats looked like frogs we'd realize what nasty, cruel little bastards they are. Style. That's what people remember.” ― Terry Pratchett.

  6. #5
    Senior Member rialisha06's Avatar
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    Citalli i dont tell u in agressive way but before say anything u must read it good coz i dont want create any missunderstanding in the forum im here to learn and i thanks all here for help me when i need..thank u so much to all and know i just need know if we can do this here is a good iddea doing different songs ..

  7. #6
    Junior Member The Arabic Student's Avatar
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    More Egyptian dialect can be found here: http://thearabicstudent.blogspot.com

    It take episodes of the Simpsons in Arabic and write out phrases that they use and give the translation. IMO, this is the best way to learn. Using authentic materials. The Egyptian Arabic Course that that song came from is also very good, but the guy has stopped updating his site for some reason. Hopefully he'll start back up.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Zahra91h's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Arabic Student View Post
    More Egyptian dialect can be found here: http://thearabicstudent.blogspot.com

    It take episodes of the Simpsons in Arabic and write out phrases that they use and give the translation. IMO, this is the best way to learn. Using authentic materials. The Egyptian Arabic Course that that song came from is also very good, but the guy has stopped updating his site for some reason. Hopefully he'll start back up.
    looooooooool simpsons in arabic language hahaha this is funny,thanks for the link... from where did u get the episodes? are there just those episodes ? i want to learn the language too

  9. #8
    Senior Member citlalli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Arabic Student View Post
    More Egyptian dialect can be found here: http://thearabicstudent.blogspot.com

    It take episodes of the Simpsons in Arabic and write out phrases that they use and give the translation. IMO, this is the best way to learn. Using authentic materials. The Egyptian Arabic Course that that song came from is also very good, but the guy has stopped updating his site for some reason. Hopefully he'll start back up.
    I was just having a look at your link.... it's great!!! Thanks a bunch
    “If cats looked like frogs we'd realize what nasty, cruel little bastards they are. Style. That's what people remember.” ― Terry Pratchett.

  10. #9
    Senior Member asidashy's Avatar
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    you explained very well
    Eline sağlık
    yeslamoo hel 2eedeyn =)

  11. #10
    Senior Member rialisha06's Avatar
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    thank u very much ...

  12. #11
    Junior Member The Arabic Student's Avatar
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    "from where did u get the episodes?"

    I got them from a site called Divx4Arab.com. It has a lot of TV shows and movies in Arabic.
    http://thearabicstudent.blogspot.com

  13. #12
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    is there anywhere a similar page to learn iraqi? its different :S
    i wonder that u all understand all dialects (the most ppls i met they understand each other even if a iraqi speak with an egypt

  14. #13
    Senior Member songlover26's Avatar
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    Nice Idea

  15. #14
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    Arabesk has facilitated study abroad for hundreds of individuals, students and specialists, with successful results with students from top American and European universities and colleges in Middle East or Arabic Studies, or many other fields (International Relations, political science, sociology, anthropology). Undergraduates and masters / graduate students, PHD professors from places like Princeton, Georgia, Stanford, Pennsylvania, and Fulbright students (2008, 2009, 2010), SOAS London, other European university students, and Australia (Melbourne, Sydney) have reported positive experiences of their time in Damascus through Arabesk. We also succeed with students that study Arabic for professional or personal purposes, pleasure or hobby.
    We also offer :
    family accommodation Damascus Syria
    student accommodation
    room for student
    accommodation for boys in "Living & Practicing".

    For more details, please feel free to contact us
    arabesk.studies@ yahoo.com
    Please visit our website:
    http://www.arabeskstudiesindamascus.com/default.aspx
    Contact Person: Maan & Mohammed Eskandar

    We hope to see you in Damascus Insha'Allah
    ARABESK STUDIES IN DAMASCUS

  16. #15
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    I need help on this translation please (habibi thats in cairo and alex maybe bas el 28 mohafzat el tanya r not going for any felol at all. its either salafi or ekhwan. abo el fotouh wa hazem ismail 3andohom sha3beya kebeera awy in the rest of mohafzat. ana kont fi masr ya basha 2 weeks ago then went to saudia wa law kont 3aref inta henak we wouldve definitely met up. elmohem hows masr treating u ya man?)

    Thank you

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nenaesther View Post
    I need help on this translation please (habibi thats in cairo and alex maybe bas el 28 mohafzat el tanya r not going for any felol at all. its either salafi or ekhwan. abo el fotouh wa hazem ismail 3andohom sha3beya kebeera awy in the rest of mohafzat. ana kont fi masr ya basha 2 weeks ago then went to saudia wa law kont 3aref inta henak we wouldve definitely met up. elmohem hows masr treating u ya man?)

    Thank you

    Darling thats in cairo and alex maybe only 28 provinces r not going for any felol at all.it is either salafi or ekhwan[these are Islamic reform movement in Egypt].abo el fotouh wa hazem ismail they have a big popularity in the rest of provinves.I was in Egypt ya Sir 2 weeks ago then went to saudia and if i would knew that u are there we wouldve definitely met up.The important things is how is Egypt treating u ya man?)

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