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Thread: Uska Dara

  1. #1
    Deliliah!!
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    Default Uska Dara

    Hi Everyone.. it's Deliliah!! from New Zealand.

    Could anyone help me to verify that the English lyrics I have transcribed from the version of Eartha Kitt's song relate to what she is saying in Turkish?

    I don 't have a copy of the Turkish lyrics written down, but I do have an MP3 that I can send to anyone who may be able to help me if they advise me of their email address.

    Most versions I have found mention "In the olden days Turkish women used to have male secretaries.. but the version I have goes something like this:



    USKA DARA


    Uska Dara is the name of a little town in Turkey and in Uska Dara they have very many s-t-r-a-n-g-e ways.

    Along with these strange ways there are very many strange sayings.. and one of them is:

    (Turkish..- starts something like this) Benesmurah etc…

    It means: I like to feed my lover birds’ milk…

    Iska Dara etc etc


    There is another saying that goes:
    (Turkish..- starts something like this) Amaaaaahn etc.

    It means: A fat man usually has a belly like a perculating coffee pot.

    Uska Dara etc etc.

    There is another saying that goes:
    (Turkish..- starts something like this) Chabara etc etc

    But you’ll have to use your imagination.

    Uska Dara


    La ha ha, aaaaah aaaah aaah
    La ha ha, aaaaah aaaah aaah


    Menta lembe etc etc …. Locum docum duru
    Menta lembe etc etc…..Locum docum duru
    Locum docum duruuu
    Locum docum duruuu
    Locum docum duruuu

    Amaaaahn etc etc etc

    Nayeysem,,, Eseyesemmm etc

    Giggle…

    Oh! Those Turks!!!!

    Many, many thanks in advance to anyone who may be able to help me... I haven't come across this version before and I want to make sure that I know what I am dancing to....

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    amnah (11-11-2011)

  3. #2
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    hi, Deliliah

    you mean the song here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPEIL7pUjMo?

    the original turkish is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFwCw1mZd1g (safiye ayla singing...)

    here are the lyrics as sung by eartha kitt (from the www):

    Eartha Kitt - Uska Dara

    Üsküdar'a gider iken aldi da bir yagmur 2x
    Kâtibimin setresi uzun, etegi çamur 2x
    Kâtip uykudan uyanmis, gözleri mahmur 2x
    Kâtip benim, ben kâtibin, ele karisir?
    Kâtibime siter eter faltu ne güzel yarasir


    Uskadara is a little town in Turkey
    And in the old days, many women had male secretaries
    Oh, well, that's Turkey!

    Üsküdar'a gider iken bir mendil buldum 2x
    Mendilimin içine lokum doldurdum 2x


    They take a trip from Uskudara in the rain
    And on the way they fall in love
    He's wearing a stiff collar
    In a full dress suit
    She looks at him longingly through her veil
    And casually feeds him candy
    Oh, those Turks!

    Kâtibimi arar iken yanimda buldum 2x
    Kâtip benim, ben kâtibin, el ne karisir?
    Kâtibime kolali da gömlek ne güzel yarasir

    Kâtibimi arar iken yanimda buldum 2x
    Kâtip benim, ben kâtibin, el ne karisir?
    Kâtibime kolali da gömlek ne güzel yarasir 2x


    the name of the town is üsküdar (now a district in istanbul), and that of the song is katibim. üsküdar'a means to üsküdar.

    and a correction: here katip indeed means a clerk or secretary, but he may not be the secretary of the woman who wrote or composed this song. when she says my katip she's most likely to mean the katip whom i'm in love with, he may even be her fiancé, for in the old days many women did not actually have male secretaries and it's usual in turkish for someone to call his/her lover as my something, be it an attribute or profession.

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  5. #3
    Deliliah!!
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    Many thanks for the information, ilkin..... especially about "katip". I do have this version, but the version I am trying to verify is slightly different... I haven't been able to find it anywhere on the internet.... it is possibly a much later version as the original one (as seen in the 1952 (or 1954) movie... I think it was called "New Faces", only had a little dialogue right at the end of her act. I think that she added to the song over the years.

    I have a very different version on a CD (and also as an MP3) which doesn't have any lyrics written down. I have transcribed the English lyrics but wondered if anyone could listen to the MP3 if I emailed it to them and let me know if the Turkish words correspond to the English ones. I realise that she probably doesn't pronounce them correctly, so it may be a little difficult.


    Are you able to help me with this? Can I email you the MP3 version? Thanks so much for your patience.

    Deliliah!!

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    (Turkish..- starts something like this) Benesmurah etc…
    here she says:

    ben esmeri fıstık ile karavaysarayda(?) apparently she gets the last part wrong or just makes it up. it should have been,

    ben esmeri fıstık ile beslerim (i feed the brunette peanuts)

    this is from another song which goes like

    ben esmeri fıstık ile
    ben esmeri fındık ile
    ben esmeri badem ile beslerim


    that is, i feed the brunette peanuts, hazelnuts and almonds.

    here müzeyyen senar singing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNnS3xT0DLQ

    There is another saying that goes:
    (Turkish..- starts something like this) Amaaaaahn etc.

    It means: A fat man usually has a belly like a perculating coffee pot.
    here only aman, peştemale giriyorsun (oh, you put on a loincloth) part is intelligible, the rest sounds meaningless and has nothing to do with her translation at all.

    There is another saying that goes:
    (Turkish..- starts something like this) Chabara etc etc

    But you’ll have to use your imagination.
    çadırımın üstüne şıp dedi damladı (it plopped onto my tent)

    this is from yet another song. here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbK3FbRD_Wo

    it's a common belly dance tune and words are just fillings, without any serious meaning.

    Menta lembe etc etc …. Locum docum duru
    Menta lembe etc etc…..Locum docum duru
    Locum docum duruuu
    Locum docum duruuu
    Locum docum duruuu
    mendilimin içine lokum doldurdum (i put candies in my handkerchief). from the katibim song (in my previous post).

    Amaaaahn etc etc etc

    Nayeysem,,, Eseyesemmm etc
    napıyorsun? iyisin. teşekkür ederim: how are you? fine. thank you.

    çok güzel, çok güzel, çok güzel, çok, çok: very good/beautiful ... very, very.

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    i know what you mean i have an old record where she sings that, but i haven'nt beeen able to find that in later song from here. you mean the song from beginning 50 ies.

  9. #6
    Deliliah!!
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    Yes..... old song from the 50's, but I think the version I have is a much later one... I believe that most of the lyrics are just something that she has made up and mean very little....

    I have performed this number (a comedy, of course) using veil work to hide my mouth when the non-English lyrics were being sung.... I had fun... people laughed.... it was a good concert.

    I think that possibly the version I have may only be available in Australia and New Zealand.

    Thanks for your input.

    Regards,

    Delilah

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deliliah!! View Post
    Yes..... old song from the 50's, but I think the version I have is a much later one... I believe that most of the lyrics are just something that she has made up and mean very little....

    I have performed this number (a comedy, of course) using veil work to hide my mouth when the non-English lyrics were being sung.... I had fun... people laughed.... it was a good concert.

    I think that possibly the version I have may only be available in Australia and New Zealand.

    Thanks for your input.

    Regards,

    Delilah
    oh the words are alright my former turkish neighbours always had agood laugh about it.it's a pity i've the record but cannot put into mp3.

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    Question My Remembrance of the Katibim is as Follows:

    I learned this song in 1954 at the age of 8 in 4th grade in a very regular American school. I was part of a children's choir and we were taught this and other fascinating little songs about different cultures.

    For the most part, the lyrics have stuck with me all of my life because they were such fun and seemed both exotic and familiar at the same time -- something which children of any culture all over the world could relate to. But over time, some of them have dissolved like Turkish candy in the rain...

    These are the lyrics as I learned them -- those that I can remember, ie:

    Uska Dara, Uska Dara, how it rains in Uska Dara...
    Uska Dara, Uska Dara how it rains out there!

    Everyone gets soaking wet and mu-u-ddy, when it ra-a-ains in Uska Dara.
    Everyone gets soaking wet and mu-u-ddy, but everyone is gay!

    Lukomin sweet Turkish candy, in your handkerchief so handy...
    In your mouth they taste so dandy... [...I'm blanking on the lyrics here...]

    When it rains we do not hurry, when it ra-a-ains in Uska Dara...
    When it rains we do not worry, because when the sun shines we can play.


    If anyone knows this wonderful child's version of the song and can fill in the blanks for me, I would just love it!

    Thanks!

  12. #9
    ercmnt
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    A very regular American school in 1954, 4th grade at the age of 8 and they teach you a turkish song in english lyrics saying "everyone is gay" ??? Did I get it right or am I too tired tonight?

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    Tyrannosaurus Regina partizanka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ercmnt View Post
    A very regular American school in 1954, 4th grade at the age of 8 and they teach you a turkish song in english lyrics saying "everyone is gay" ??? Did I get it right or am I too tired tonight?
    LMAO...I think it's the older meaning of the word...i.e. very happy. But I could be wrong...maybe it was a very progressive school.

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    Smile Hi! And thanks for responding!

    Quote Originally Posted by ercmnt View Post
    A very regular American school in 1954, 4th grade at the age of 8 and they teach you a turkish song in english lyrics saying "everyone is gay" ??? Did I get it right or am I too tired tonight?
    Yes, you got it right.

    Times were different then and "gay" meant happy and light-hearted and apparently there was less Xenophobia in some ways than there is now.

    We also learned a little Chinese song called Camel-Back Bridge:

    Camel-Back Bridge, oh-oh, Camel-Back Bridge...
    Each step leads up, 'til you get to the ridge...
    Lantern grass grows on the pond like a sail...
    Silver fish bites at Goldfish's tail...
    B-ig croaking frog sitting there on the rocks...
    Bu-an, Bu-an, Bu-an he mocks...
    Bu-an, Bu-an, Bu-an he mocks.


    I loved those songs we were taught. They created images in the imagination that were so compelling and beautiful...

    I know we also learned others from different cultures, but the only one I can think of besides these two right now is The Happy Wanderer... which is a kind of German/Swiss/Italian Alpine song.

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    Smile Thanks to you also.

    Quote Originally Posted by partizanka View Post
    LMAO...I think it's the older meaning of the word...i.e. very happy. But I could be wrong...maybe it was a very progressive school.
    No, it wasn't what I'd call a progressive school.

    It was populated by a fairly even mix of Irish and Italian Catholics and Protestants -- of which I was the latter -- but that doesn't matter either because there was a good spirit of ecumenism in our town: Corning, New York -- which was a bit ahead of the curve before the 60s when all of that started to take off rather big.

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    Smile Loreena McKennitt Does a Fantastic Version of This Song

    Loreena McKennitt Does a Fantastic Version of the Katibim.

    You can picture a wild dance scene in an Turkish Oda when she sings it, and her voice is beautiful -- but YouTube seems to have taken down the version I thought I remembered in which she sings and only left the instrumental from her album -- there are others in which she sings wonderful Middle Eastern tunes...

    Also there is one rather amusing YouTube video in which there are 3 different versions of the song: By Eydie Gorme, Ertha Kitt and someone else:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jH6OFS0dMVg

    But I still like the children's version I learned all those many years ago the best.

    I don't know how far this strays from the topic of the song and its lyrics, but a book I read about Turkey back when I was a kid called A Death in Ankara sparked a kind of life-long interest in that area of the world and the romance of the politics and intrigue that go on there.

    And articles in one of the American magazines designated for girls back in those days -- either Seventeen or Young Miss, I can't remember which -- which delved into a girl's life under the veil, about a Muslim girl coming of age and going with her mother to pick out her first chadri and her feelings of conflict over the loss of childhood freedom and the excitement of becoming a woman under the mysterious veil?

    In many ways wish we could go back to those times when there at least seemed to be more human understanding between the Middle East and Western culture.

    And I'll stop there before the comment edges too far into anything political.

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    Senior Member amnah's Avatar
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    Many thanks to all of you<3

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    ercmnt.. the Term gay mean as follows..Older Use. having or showing a merry, lively mood:
    gay spirits; gay music.
    6.
    Older Use. bright or showy:
    gay colors; gay ornaments.
    7.
    Older Use. given to or abounding in social or other pleasures:
    a gay social season; the Gay Nineties.

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