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  1. #1
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    Default Translations to Bosnian

    Hello all. I am new to this forum.

    I would like to learn Bosnian.

    Could you please translate the following into Bosnian?

    Grammar 1: Conjugation of "be" with adjectives

    I am good
    You are good
    He is good
    She is good
    We are good
    You are (plural) good
    They are good

    Grammar 2: Copula

    I am
    It's you
    He is
    She is
    We are
    You (plural) are
    They're

    Negation

    I am not
    You're not
    He's not
    She is not
    We are not
    You (plural) are not
    They're not

    I look forward to hearing your excellent responses. And I should point out that I'm going to post all translation requests in this thread so that it'll keep my notes together.
    Last edited by memobekes; 02-07-2011 at 01:25 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mimi0920's Avatar
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    Hello!

    I'm learning too, you asked for pretty much 95 % of what I already know I hope I got everything right

    Grammar 1: Conjugation of "be" with adjectives

    I am good - ja sam dobar (male)/dobra (female)
    You are good - ti si dobar/dobra
    He is good - on je dobar
    She is good - ona je dobra
    There's a neutral form too: it is good - ono je dobro
    We are good - mi smo dobri (male)/dobre (female)
    You are (plural) good - vi ste dobri/e
    They are good - oni su dobri (male)/one su dobre (female)/ona su dobra (neutral)

    Grammar 2: Copula

    I am - ja sam
    It's you - ti si
    He is - on je
    She is - ona je
    it is - ono je
    We are - mi smo
    You (plural) are - vi ste
    They're - oni/one/ona su

    Negation

    I am not - ja nisam
    You're not - ti nisi
    He's not - on nije
    She is not - ona nije
    it is not - ono nije
    We are not - mi nismo
    You (plural) are not - vi niste
    They're not - oni/one/ona nisu

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mimi0920 View Post
    Hello!

    I'm learning too, you asked for pretty much 95 % of what I already know I hope I got everything right
    Well done! Where are you from? And thank you for your help.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Mimi0920's Avatar
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    You're welcome I'm from Austria, you?

  6. #5
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    Grammar 3: Plural

    What letter is used for the nominative plural ending in the Bosnian language?

    the child - the children
    the telephone - the phones
    the girl - the girls

    Words ending in a vowel (a, e, o, u) revert to which letter in plural form of masculine?

    For example:

    the University - the universities
    the brother - the brothers

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mimi0920 View Post
    You're welcome I'm from Austria, you?
    Turkey

  8. #7
    ina
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    Merhaba!

    For the concrete nouns and abstract nouns:

    1. genre: masculine, nominative singular ending in a consonant:
    jastuk - jastuci [pillow]
    frižider - frižideri [frige]
    most - mostovi [bridge]
    bol - bolovi [pain]
    čaj - čajevi [tea]

    2. genre: neuter (and masculine), nominative singular ending in vowels -o and -e:
    mastilo - mastila [ink]
    ime - imena [name]
    dete - deca [child]
    veslo - vesla [oar]

    3. genre: feminine (and masculine), nominative singular ending in vowel -a:
    čorba - čorbe [broth]
    kapija - kapije [gate]
    žena - žene [woman]

    4. genre: feminine, nominative singular ending in a consonant:
    stvar - stvari [thing]

    5. genre: feminine, nominative singular ending in -st:
    kost - kosti [bone]
    radost - radosti [joy]

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  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ina View Post
    Merhaba!
    Merhaba. Are you Bosnian? Let me ask in Bosnian too and see if I was accurate or not, hehe hehe

    Imas iz Bosna? Thank you (hvala za) for the translations.

    Grammer 4: Relative Clause

    >the man who comes
    >the man I know
    > the woman who goes
    > the woman he thinks
    > the children who go out
    > the children that you see
    > the one I know

    In Bosnian, is the particle "da" comparable to "that" and "which"?

  11. #9
    ina
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    Salam!

    No, I'm not Bosnian. Ne, ja nisam Bosanka.
    I'm from Serbia. Ja sam iz Srbije.

    Are you Bosnian? --> Da li si ti (da li ste Vi) Bosanac (m) / Bosanka? (f)
    Are you from Bosnia? --> Da li si iz Bosne?

    Imaš iz Bosna -> Imaš iz Bosne? could only mean something like "Do you have (something) from Bosnia?"

    Actually, that "Bosnian" language I would call Serbo-Croatian language.

    In Bosnian, is the particle "da" comparable to "that" and "which"?
    Yes, we can say that. "Da" has many meanings. I believe "da" is used more often in Serbian language.

    G4: Odnosne (relativne) rečenice

    >the man who comes: čov(j)ek koji dolazi
    >the man I know: čov(j)ek koga znam, čov(j)ek koga poznajem
    > the woman who goes: žena koja ide
    > the woman he thinks: žena za koju (on) misli (da ...)
    > the children who go out: d(j)eca koja idu van
    > the children that you see: d(j)eca koju vidiš
    > the one I know: (m) onog koga znam
    (f) onu koju znam
    (n) ono koje znam, ono što znam
    or Onog/Onu/Ono što znam (very informal).

    Güle güle!
    Last edited by ina; 02-11-2011 at 09:14 AM.

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  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ina View Post
    Salam!
    Selam. I am actually a Zaza Kurd from Turkey. I would be very happy to teach you some of Zazaki too. Did you know that Zazaki is related to other Iranian languages such as Persian and Ossetian? The Iranian languages are also very close to the Slavic languages as both groups belong to the Satem branch of the Indo-European languages. We also share a lot of basic vocabulary and grammatical features.



    Quote Originally Posted by ina View Post
    Imaš iz Bosna -> Imaš iz Bosne? could only mean something like "Do you have (something) from Bosnia?"
    hehe hehe Well I tried my best But with expert advice (from people like yourself), I'm confident that I can improve in the near future. Imas derives from the verb "to have"?

    Quote Originally Posted by ina View Post
    Actually, that "Bosnian" language I would call Serbo-Croatian language.
    Honestly I would love to learn Serbian too But I am nervous about my inability to master the Cyrillic script It would be very difficult, wouldn't it? But Bosnian (as you pointed out) is very similar to Bosnian and Bulgarian, right?


    Quote Originally Posted by ina View Post
    Yes, we can say that. "Da" has many meanings. I believe "da" is used more often in Serbian language.
    In Zazaki, the equivalent to "da" is "ke"

    I would like to share some basic sentences from Zazaki

    Ma be xer di > hello
    xer be silamet > hello (response)
    Hale to citurio? > How is your state (well-being)
    Ez rindu > I am good, well
    Ti koti rawane > where are you from?
    Ti cand serre dera? How old are you?
    Wes u war be! > thank you
    Ti ci kar kena? What is your job?
    Ti koti de wesiya xo ramena? Where do you live?
    Ti Sirbski qesey kena? Do you speak Serbian?
    Heya, ez Sirbski qesey kenu > Yes, I speak Serbian

    Soon, I would like to give some examples comparing the similarities between our languages (Zazaki and Serbian)

    Dobro dan!

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  15. #11
    Senior Member Mimi0920's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by memobekes View Post
    Imas derives from the verb "to have"?
    to have - imati

    ja imam
    ti imaš
    on/ona/ono ima
    mi imamo
    vi imate
    oni/one/ona imaju

    Quote Originally Posted by memobekes View Post
    Honestly I would love to learn Serbian too But I am nervous about my inability to master the Cyrillic script It would be very difficult, wouldn't it?
    It's not that difficult in my opinion, UNLESS it's handwritten. If you just want to read typed cyrillic all you need is a few hours of time and some practise, trust me

    Is Zazaki written in latin letters btw?


    Quote Originally Posted by memobekes View Post
    Dobro dan!
    -> Dobar dan!

    male -> dobar - dobar prijatelj (good male friend)
    female -> dobra - dobra prijateljica (good female friend)
    neutral -> dobro - dobro dete (good child)

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  17. #12
    ina
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    Ma be xer di! (What a long hello!)

    Thank you, but I'm not an expert.
    Thank you for for your examples, but it's difficult for me to see the similarities between our languages, at least for now. But I understood that Serbian/Croatioan grammer is more close to Zazaki then to Turkish, maybe. But words are very different. Well, "ramena" in Serbian means shoulders!

    Yes, you have to practice word cases and genders (Dobar dan, iz Bosne...)
    I believe you wanted to say Doviđenja (Goodbye) instead of Dobar dan (Good day/afternoon).

    Bosnian is mainly a mixture of Croatian and Serbian, with lots of Turkish words. Serbian and Croatian are very similar; Bulgarian and Serbian are close too, but less than you think. (But we can understand each other.) Serbian-Bulgarian is like Spanish-Portuguese.

    The Cyrillic script is not hard at all! You just need to get used to it.
    Last edited by ina; 02-11-2011 at 09:24 AM.

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