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  1. #1
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    Smile Let's celebrate Norooz (Nowruz)

    Hi my friends,

    Let's celebrate Norooz (Nowruz). It's one of the most beautiful ceremonies in this world. I dedicate this topic to all of my friends. I say apology for my bad deeds this year and ask for forgiveness. It's a Persian custom to befriend again in this time of year. We're human, we're born to make mistakes.

    I will talk about it in the next posts.









    Last edited by veryclever1980; 03-14-2011 at 12:50 PM.
    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  3. #2
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    The best summary for it would be:

    "In harmony with rebirth of nature, the Persian New Year Celebration, or Norooz, always begins on the first day of spring, March 20th of each year. Norooz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts - the End and Rebirth. About 3000 years ago Persian's major religion was Zoroastrianism, named in honor of its founder Zoroaster, and arguably the world's first monotheistic religion. Zoroastrians had a festival called "Farvardgan" which lasted ten days, and took place at the end of the solar year. It appears that this was a festival of sorrow and mourning , signifying the end of life while the festival of Norooz, at the beginning of spring signified rebirth, and was a time of great joy and celebration. Norooz was officially acknowledged and named "Norooz" by mythical Persian emperor, Shah Jamshid, from Achaemenid Dynasty (500 BC). Achaemenid created the first major empire in the region and built Persepolis complex (Takhte Jamshid) in the city of Shiraz. Norooz in Persian means "New Day" and brings hope, peace and prosperity to the world and has been celebrated among people regardless of ethnic background, political views or religion in many countries around the globe such as Iran, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Georgia, Iraq, Tajikistan, Syria ,Armenia and India. Some of the activities during Norooz are Spring cleaning, buying new cloths, painting eggs, family reunion, giving presents, visiting neighbors and friends and celebrating by having a picnic on the 13th day of Spring."

    (Source: http://www.norooz.ca/)
    Last edited by veryclever1980; 03-14-2011 at 09:48 AM.
    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  5. #3
    Senior Member pinky_girl's Avatar
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    I love norouz very much....tooo bad we can't have a "7 Sin" this year cause we are gonna go on a tripI WISH A WONDERUL YEAR FOR ALL OF YOU

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  7. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinky_girl View Post
    I love norouz very much....tooo bad we can't have a "7 Sin" this year cause we are gonna go on a tripI WISH A WONDERUL YEAR FOR ALL OF YOU
    So you want to be within the nature in that time. It' so wonderful.
    Happy new year my dearest Pinky Girl.
    Eydet Mobarak hamchenin (aussi/too)
    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

  8. #5
    Senior Member Paul Orhan's Avatar
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    Azizam ,

    What you write about Norooz reminds me so much about our Easter! The symbolics of Easter are very much the same as Norooz's, which, to me, is another proof for common roots of so many beliefs. That in our core we're the same, no matter what country or culture we come from.

    And you also paint the eggs, WOW!!! Didn't know that

    One question: is 21st March the same date in your Persian (lunar) calendar (I think not but could you confirm that)?

    I do hope you'll say something more about the Norooz dishes
    Last edited by Paul Orhan; 03-18-2011 at 05:47 PM.

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  10. #6
    Senior Member Paul Orhan's Avatar
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    These are some examples of traditional Polish painted eggs that are called "pisanka" (although 'pisać' means 'to write' ) Various techniques are used by our folk artists to get this effect but the precision and beauty of their handwork always amazes me!

    The green one is especially for you, teaCheriM! The pattern is painted with liquid colour wax that dries on the painted egg.



    Last edited by Paul Orhan; 03-14-2011 at 05:44 AM.

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  12. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinky_girl View Post
    I WISH A WONDERUL YEAR FOR ALL OF YOU
    The very same to you, Pinky_Girl!
    May it be a time of joy and prosperity, and may the new year bring only happy moments!

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  14. #8
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    Thank you so much Pawel, let's talk about the prelude to Nowruz:

    "Chahārshanbe-Sūri (Persian: چهارشنبه *سوری, pronounced Chārshambe-Sūri) meaning Wednesday Feast, from the word sour which means feast in Persian is an ancient Iranian festival dating back to at least 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. Also called the Festival of Fire, it is a prelude to Nowruz, which marks the arrival of spring. Traditionally celebrated on the last Tuesday night of the year, Chahrshanbeh Soori has, since the Iranian revolution, been marked on the evening before the last Wednesday. The words Chahar Shanbeh mean Wednesday and Suri means red. Bonfires are lit to "keep the sun alive" until early morning. The celebration usually starts in the evening, with people making bonfires in the streets and jumping over them singing zardi-ye man az to, sorkhi-ye to az man. The literal translation is, my sickly yellow paleness is yours, your fiery red color is mine. This is a purification rite. Loosely translated, this means you want the fire to take your paleness, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and energy." (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaharshanbe_Suri)





    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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    The next important sign of Nowruz is Haji Firooz (Firouz):

    "The traditional herald of the Nowruz season is a man called Hājī Fīrūz (or Khwāja Pīrūz). He symbolizes the rebirth of the Sumerian god of sacrifice, Domuzi, who was killed at the end of each year and reborn at the beginning of the New Year. He usually uses face paint to make his skin black (black is an ancient Persian symbol of good luck) and wears a red costume. Then he sings and dances through the streets with tambourines and trumpets spreading good cheer and heralds the coming of the New Year. Mehrdad Bahar, Iranologist, suggests in his book that this borrowing of the Domuzi/Tammuz tradition from the ancient non-Iranian civilizations in Mesopotamia happened with the arrival of the Iranian tribes to the western parts of the Iranian Plateau at the beginning of the 1st millennium BC. This borrowing, according to Bahar, may be true for the whole Nowruz tradition itself as Indo-Iranian tribes before that did not have this tradition while the civilizations of Mesopotamia did. This later spread to all areas where Iranian culture was present, but was lost by the non-Iranian cultures of Mesopotamia." (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haji_firouz)


    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  18. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Orhan View Post
    One question: is 20th March the same date in your Persian (lunar) calendar (I think not but could you confirm that)?
    There is an exact moment which we call "تحویل سال Tahvil e Sal". It's always changing:

    "Nowruz marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in Iranian calendar. It is celebrated on the day of the astronomical vernal equinox, which usually occurs on March 21 or the previous/following day depending on where it is observed. As well as being a Zoroastrian holiday and having significance amongst the Zoroastrian ancestors of modern Iranians, the same time is celebrated in parts of the South Asian sub-continent as the new year. The moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator and equalizes night and day is calculated exactly every year and Iranian families gather together to observe the rituals." (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowruz)

    This year (1390) it will be:

    Tehran: Monday March 21, 2011, 02:50:45 AM
    Los Angeles: Sunday March 20, 2011, 16:20:45 PM
    Paris: Monday March 21, 2011, 00:20:45 AM
    Warsaw: Monday March 21, 2011, 00:20:45 AM
    London: Sunday March 20, 2011, 23:20:45 PM
    Baghdad: Monday March 21, 2011, 03:20:45 AM
    Ankara: Monday March 21, 2011, 01:20:45 AM
    Melbourne: Monday March 21, 2011, 09:20:45 AM
    Berlin: Monday March 21, 2011, 00:20:45 AM
    Toronto: Sunday March 20, 2011, 19:20:45 PM

    For a countdown, you can visit here:
    http://www.7seen.com/
    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  20. #11
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    Now it's time for its most beautiful part:

    "Haft Sîn (Persian: هفت سین) or the seven 'S's is a major traditional table setting of Nowruz, the traditional Iranian spring celebration.Today The haft sin table includes seven specific items starting with the letter 'S' or Sīn (س) in the Persian alphabet. The items symbolically correspond to seven creations and holy immortals called Amesha Sepanta protecting them. The seven elements of Life, namely Fire, Earth, Water, Air, Plants, Animals, and Human, are represented. They also have Astrological correlations to five planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Sun and Moon. With the advent of Islam the word Amesha Sepanta shortened to and eventually was remembered by just the letter S and the number 7. The Haft Sin has evolved over time, but has kept its symbolism. Traditionally, families attempt to set as beautiful a Haft Sīn table as they can, as it is not only of traditional and spiritual value, but also noticed by visitors during Nowruzi visitations and is a reflection of their good taste.

    The Haft Sīn items are:

    • sabzeh - wheat, barley or lentil sprouts growing in a dish - symbolizing rebirth
    • samanu - a sweet pudding made from wheat germ - symbolizing affluence
    • senjed - the dried fruit of the oleaster tree - symbolizing love
    • sīr - garlic - symbolizing medicine
    • sīb - apples - symbolizing beauty and health
    • somaq - sumac berries - symbolizing (the color of) sunrise
    • serkeh - vinegar - symbolizing age and patience.

    Other items on the table may include:

    • Sonbol - Hyacinth (plant)
    • Sekkeh - Coins - representative of wealth
    • traditional Iranian pastries such as baghlava and naan-nokhodchi
    • Aajeel - dried nuts, berries and raisins
    • lit candles (enlightenment and happiness)
    • a mirror (symbolizing cleanness and honesty)
    • decorated eggs, sometimes one for each member of the family (fertility)
    • a bowl of water with goldfish (life within life, and the sign of Pisces which the sun is leaving). As an essential object of the Nowruz table, this goldfish is also "very ancient and meaningful" and with Zoroastrian connection.[63]
    • rosewater, believed to have magical cleansing powers
    • the national colours, for a patriotic touch
    • a holy book (e.g., the Avesta, Qur'an, Bible, Torah, or Kitáb-i-Aqdas) and/or a poetry book (almost always either the Shahnameh or the Divan of Hafez)"

    (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haft-Sin)



    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  22. #12
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    And finally, let's talk about our traditional dish for Nowruz.

    People from different regions in Iran, cook several dishes for Nowruz, but there is a signature dish for it.

    Sabzi Polo Mahi: We cook rice with different herbs, and call it Sabzi Polo. Some herbs are very essential here and they are Parsley, Coriander and Dill. We, southern people of Iran, also add Green Garlic. Some people use fenugreek too. We serve this rice with fried or barbecued fish.



    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  24. #13
    Senior Member astorias's Avatar
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    WOW! thaNk you teacherim! thiS thread iciN! vE alsO informationler iCiN! ♥
    this thread iS reallY jaleB ♥ ! and i"m so glad thaT ouR frienDs like pauL caN have some informatioN about nowrooZ ! !: )

    Quote Originally Posted by pinky_girl View Post
    I love norouz very much....tooo bad we can't have a "7 Sin" this year cause we are gonna go on a tripI WISH A WONDERUL YEAR FOR ALL OF YOU
    havE a nice timE ! and see you neXt year !!
    salE noE khoobiyo vasaT arezoomandaM 2rsaaaaaaaaa! !
    ـــ★ـــ it seeMs likE every day's the saMe...
    aNd i'm leFt to discoVer on my owN...
    It seemS like everythinG is graY...
    and there's No coloR to beHold..

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  26. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by astorias View Post
    WOW! thaNk you teacherim! thiS thread iciN! vE alsO informationler iCiN! ♥
    this thread iS reallY jaleB ♥ ! and i"m so glad thaT ouR frienDs like pauL caN have some informatioN about nowrooZ ! !: )
    You've made me blush BenIm yIlDIzIm,
    You and Pawel were the main inspirations behind it. I should thank you.
    Happy New Year
    Va
    Eydet Mobarak
    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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  28. #15
    Senior Member astorias's Avatar
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    welL, i likE all of these !!
    what caN i do buT liKE zadaN?! !!

    + mY sister and i are going to starT egg paintingS ! I'll makE some for you pauL !

    + and about sabZI polo maHi, i thinK viv would like this cauSe she juST loves fiSH !

    p.S: so good thaT saL tahvil's at 02:50:45 AM! thaT feelS so good wheN shaBa sal tahvilE ! ♥
    btw, eydE shomaAM mobaraK !!! salE notooNam mobaraK piSHapiSh! ♥
    ـــ★ـــ it seeMs likE every day's the saMe...
    aNd i'm leFt to discoVer on my owN...
    It seemS like everythinG is graY...
    and there's No coloR to beHold..

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  30. #16
    Senior Member astorias's Avatar
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    thIS is the HAftsin !!



    how abouT 13bedaR teacherim?! ! that'S one oF the besT days for me ever ! ! speciallY partabE sabZe dar ab! !!! harchanD ke sabzehayE ma hamishe ta 13bedar kharaB mishe aMa ___! !!!

    Sizdahbedar or Sizdah Be-dar (Persian Sizdah Bedar ) is the name of a ceremony in Persian Culture. Sizdah is the Persian term for thirteen. Leaving the house on the Thirteenth Day of Farvardin (the first month of Iranian calendar), and joyfully spending the day outdoors have been a national tradition since ancient times in Iran. Sizdah Bedar (in English: Getting rid of the Thirteenth) has been possibly considered as a tradition because some people believe the thirteen is an unlucky number, and everybody should get rid of the thirteen. That interpretation may be disputed since it is documented that in Persian, Bedar may also mean Raftan-e beh Dar-o Dasht (in English: Going Outdoors and Country Sides). Most of the times Sizdah Bedar coincides with the first day of April, which is known as April Fools' Day in the Western Culture.

    Like the Iranian New Year (in Persian: Nowruz, aka Know Rooz), the tradition of Sizdah Bedar also traces back to the era of legendary king Jamshid who celebrated this outdoor festival together with his people, the Iranians. Researcher Mohammad Ahmad Panahi Semnaani noted that, “The essence of the Sizdah Bedar ceremonies is the enthusiasm to set up a family, lead a happy life and form friendship. By growing sprouts, ancient Iranians expressed their spirit for green environment and seek further divine blessings in the form of rain for their farmlands. Iranians believed that the Demon of Drought was defeated at midday of Sizdah Bedar. They used to sacrifice sheep and cook kebab in the open areas to celebrate victory of the Angel of Rain against the Demon of Drought”.

    Sizdah Bedar has also its roots in the Zoroastrian belief that laughter and joy symbolize the throwing away of all bad thoughts. According to Zoroastrianism, the bad thoughts are coming from the Devil Angra Mainyu (in Middle Persian: Ahriman) and the celebrations of New Year and Sizdah Bedar will cleanse all bad thoughts. Avesta, the holy scripture of the Zoroastrian faith, recalls that all those who love purity were responsible for celebrating Sizdah Bedar to help the Angel of Goodness prevail over the earth in the struggle against the Evil and the Devil.

    In modern times Iranians head for parks, gardens or country sides, and enjoy their day together in a picnic. On Sizdah Bedar, many big cities in Iran look empty and unpopulated and as researcher Ali A. Jafari noted, “Cities and villages turn into ghost towns with almost all the inhabitants gone to enjoy the day in woods and mountains along stream and riversides”. At the end of their picnics people throw away the Sabzeh (from the Haft Seen that they prepared for the first day of New Year).The Sabzeh is supposed to have collected the sickness, pain and ill fate hiding on the path of the family throughout the coming year. Touching someone else’s Sabzeh on Sizdah Bedar or bringing it home is considered to be unhealthy, and may invite other peoples’ pain and hardship to the person who brought it over.

    Sizdeh Bedar gives Iranians a chance to participate a ceremony out in nature singing, dancing, performing many traditional activities, and enjoying the fresh smell of spring. One of the popular traditions of Sizdah Bedar is the knotting of blades of grass by the young unmarried girls in the hope to marry soon and expressing their wish and hope for good fortune in life and love. ** It has been documented that in the Iranian culture, the knotting of the grass represents love and the bond between a man and a woman. The young girls weave together fresh herbs, singing as they do so in a low voice: "Next Sizdah-Bedar, I hope to be in my husband’s home, and as a lady holding a baby" (In Persian: Sizdah Bedar Saal-e Degar Khaaneh-ye Showhar Bacheh Beh Baghal). While the young girls are singing and knotting the blades of grass, the young boys usually play traditional games and sports.

    Sizdah Bedar is also a day for competitive games. Games using horse are often chosen since this animal is also representing the Deity of Rain. Adults and older people may play the traditional game of backgammon. During the picnic day of Sizdah Bedar, some people also follow the oldest prank-tradition in the world and play jokes on each other. This has possibly led many men and women to consider that the origin of the April Fools’ Day goes back to the Iranian tradition of Sizdah Bedar.

    Sizdah Bedar is a day to celebrate people’s friendship with nature and it shows that the Iranians have attached to and have been fond of the natural beauties of the environment all throughout their glorious history. Today, the feast of Sizdah Bedar is not only celebrated in Iran but its outdoor moments are joyfully spent in most parts of the world by many Iranians who left their beautiful lovely homeland behind and they now live abroad...

    wikipedia! !

    ** !!!!!!!!___! maN vaghaN iNo nemidoonestaM!!!!!
    i thinK thaT'll be great if we juST arezoohamooNo be zabooN biyarim!
    ـــ★ـــ it seeMs likE every day's the saMe...
    aNd i'm leFt to discoVer on my owN...
    It seemS like everythinG is graY...
    and there's No coloR to beHold..

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  32. #17
    Senior Member Paul Orhan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by astorias View Post
    + mY sister and i are going to starT egg paintingS ! I'll makE some for you pauL !
    mAmnoonAm aStoriaS-jAn - I love all types of eggs, painted eggs included!!!

    And now I really understand why this little girl in Jafar Panahi's "White Ballon" was so obsessed with buying a gold fish in a bowl!!! Thank you so much for this thread cLeveriM! SOoo inspiring. I love everything about it but since I can't cook I guess Haft Sin would be my favourite part of it!

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    Thank you stArIm Benim,
    Thank you for 13 be dar, I love it very much too. You know, when we want to explain one of our costumes to our overseas friends, we have to research for it and then we will learn so many new things. For example, I didn't know Haji Firouz would die at the end of the year and would be reborn at the dawn of the new year.

    P.S.
    Rasti, man kolli aks gozashtam tu thread, fek konam bedoone fandogh shekan didish khahariye golam.
    ***The translations have been done by Bijan Kardouni AKA veryclever1980***

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    Quote Originally Posted by astorias View Post
    thIS is the HAftsin !!

    I carefully inspected this HaftSin according to the provided guidelines and it looks impeccable! Beautiful!

  36. #20
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    Salam be hamegi! Wow Thank you guys for this thread! My soul is relaxing every time i log in ^_^. Norooz mobarak doosthae azizam!!
    عمیق ترین درد زندگی مردن نیست بلکه نداشتن کسی است که الفبای دوست داشتن را برایت تکرار کند و تو از او رسم محبت را بیاموزی

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