Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    Post Learning Yemeni Dialect

    Hi everyone. This would be my first contribution here. I was into forums business long ago especially video games forums but different time different hobby.

    I assumed nobody started a Yemeni dialect thread before in AllTheLyrics. I hope u'll find it beneficial and interesting.

    Yemeni Dialect is one of the hardest dialect in the Arab world to understand (my opinion, it competes with Libyan and Algerian Dialect; the later is difficult because it is mixed with French). I borrowed from jnvlv247 (thanx jnvlv) her list of words for the Yemeni dialect translation. I'll start with dialect of the northern part especially Sanaa - the capital. People of Aden in the south have totally different accent.

    Who - Men
    What - Mahu
    When - Aieheen
    Where - Faien
    Why - Leesh
    How - Kaiff/ Kaiff-ah

    How are you? - Kaief halak? (m)/ Kaief hallish? (f)
    Fine/good - Tammam (alhamd-llah)
    What's up/new - Eesh msoui?/ Eesh men jaddeed?
    Nothing new - Mabish shee (jaddeed)
    Thanks - Teslam/ shukran/ ashkurak (m)/ ashkurish (f)
    Please - Lau sammaht (m)/ Lau sammahti (f)
    No - Ma3/ La'
    Yes - Ai-oih/ Na3m
    Hello - Ahlan (wa sahlan)
    Bye - Ma3salamah

    I want - Ashtee
    You want - Tishtee (m)/ Tishtai (f)
    He wants - Yishtee
    She wants - Tishtee
    They want - Yishtau (m)/ Yishtain (f)
    We want - Nishtee
    You (ppl) want - Antom tishtau (m)/ Antan tishtain (f)

    Here - Hanai'
    There - Honak
    This - Ha-thai'
    That - Ha-thak
    Today - Al-youm (hathai')
    Tomorrow - Q-duah/ Bukrah
    Yesterday - Mms
    Not - Mish
    I am not - Ana mish....

    And, for the lovers:
    I love you - Ahbak (m)/ Ahbish (f)
    Term of endearment ->
    "Ya noor 3eooni" - literally means (the light of my eyes), basically means (my love).
    "Eish al-hala eish al-jamal?" means (oh.. how beautiful you are?) as a complement.
    "Ya roohee, ya galbee" literally means (my soul, my heart), basically means (you are my heart).

    1 - Wahed (m) / Wahedeh (f)
    2 - Ithnaien (m) / Thintaien (f)
    3 - Thalatheh (m) / Thalath (f)
    4 - Arba3ah (m) / Arba3 (f)
    5 - Khamseh (m) / Khams (f)
    6 - Sitteh (m) / Sit (f)
    7 - Sab3ah (m) / Sab3 (m)
    8 - Tha-manaieh (m) / Tha-man (f)
    9 - Tisa3ah (m) / Tis3 (f)
    10 - 3sharrah (m) / 3shir (f)

    Remember:-
    * For counting, u should use the male (m) pronunciation.

    * For attaching a number to an object or people, it's not common to use one or two attached with the object name. It will be embedded within the word.
    Example: the word "Toffahhah" means an apple. U can say one apple "Toffahhah Wahedeh" but it is not common to use. Same with "Toffahhatain" - 2 apples. This rule is excluded when u want to describe 2 men and 2 women. "Raj-al" means a man. When u want to describe 2 men u shouldn't say "Raj-alaien" it sounds very weird and nobody say it in the dialect; u should say "Ithnaien Rij-al" -> "Rij-al" is the plural of "Raj-al".
    For "Mar-aih" which means a woman, when u want to say 2 women, u say "Thintaien Nisa' " (Gotcha!, totally different word for plural of woman, isn't it?). The plural of "Mar-aih" is "Nisa' ".

    * For numbering more than 2, u should be fine stating the number and after it the plural name of the object. In official Arabic u have to identify if the name of the object is male or female. Some objects have male names and others have female ones (these u got to know through studying the language). For dialect, thankfully, u just have to stick with the female (f) pronunciation of numbers in either case.
    Example: "Khams Toffahhahhat" - 5 apples. "Toffahhah" - apple is a female name in Arabic.
    "Khams Borto-qaalat" - 5 oranges. It is less common to say "Khamseh Borto-qaalat". "Borto-qaalat" is plural of "Borto-qaal" which means an orange, a male name in Arabic.

    *Major Changes in Yemeni Dialect:
    > The character ( ' ) at the end or middle of a word is similar to (o'clock) in English but u should pronounce it more like stopping breathing when u start to pronounce "A" (glottal stop). Also in some versions, it is written (2) like "La2" instead of "La' " (which means No).
    >The character (3) at the beginning, middle or end of some words means the Arabic letter "ع" "A'aien" or "3aien" as in "عنب" as "3nab" (grape) (I guess many of u know these. I just mention it for ppl who are not Arabic speakers and doesn't know).
    >The letter "ذ" "Thal" (pronounced like "th" in "then" not like "th" in "thin") as in "ذيب" "Theeb" - wolf or "ذكي" "Thaki" - clever, stays the same in Yemeni dialect. Unlike other Arabic countries like Lebanon or Egypt which they change it in some words to "D" like "Deeb" instead of "Theeb" or to "Z" like "Zaki" instead of "Thaki".
    >The letter "ق" "Qaf" is pronounced differently than other Arabic countries. U pronounce it "G" like "قلب" "Galb" instead of "Qalb" (means heart).
    >Other letters that doesn't change with pronunciation are "ظ" "Thah" as in "نظرة" "Nathrah" (a look) and "ج" "Jeem" as in "جمل" "Jamal" (a camel).

    I hope the introduction satisfied u. I'll add some other lessons in the future.

    "Abserkum ba3-dain" - See u Later

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ash4u For This Useful Post:
    Bint Al arab (12-14-2016)

  3. #2
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    this is a good start!
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to WannaBFluent For This Useful Post:
    Bint Al arab (12-14-2016)

  5. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    Thank you.. glad u like it.

  6. #4
    Senior Member hob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Thanks
    35
    Thanked 148 Times in 123 Posts

    True it's not an easy dialect, thanks for sharing.

  7. #5
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    just a little question. do you wrote a difference between ه (ha) and ح (Ha)? because you wrote 'h' everytime, so we do not know what arabic letter it is. it would be better if you wrote 'h' for the ha and '7' for the Ha.
    Last edited by WannaBFluent; 01-11-2014 at 12:12 PM.
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

  8. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    Hob @ Yeah, it is.. even some arab communities don't understand alot when 2 Yemenis talking.

    WannaBFluent @ ah.. it seems I didn't mention it here. It was gonna be better with this addition. But other work by arabic I put in the forum had this differentiation. This thread was my first here.

  9. #7
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    just to clarify the situation, what dialect of Yemeni do you speak? where do you come from exactly in Yemen?
    do you speak San'ani, Ta'izzi, Adani, Hadhrami, Tihami? or are you from Somalia?
    besides, remember that some of the dialects spoken in Yemen are not considered as Arabic dialects because they come from Sabaen, an old south arabian language as these dialects :
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

  10. #8
    ☼♛ATL-holic☂✌ aila's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Thanks
    378
    Thanked 288 Times in 245 Posts

    does people from Hadrami speak like above?

  11. #9
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    I know that it is not the language of the people who live in Sana'a. in Sanaani Arabic, it would be :
    2ayn? - where?
    maa? - what?
    kayf ant(i)? - how are you? (f)
    naahi(ya) / bi 5ayr (al hamdu llah) - fine / good (all praises and thanks be to Allah) (f)
    etc...
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

  12. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    Aila @ Most of the ppl in Hadhramaut region speak Arabic but quite differently from what I showed above which is the dialect of the ppl of Sana'a - the capital.

    WannaBFluent @ I'm Yemeni from Sana'a dear and the dialect I wrote for Sana'a ppl is pretty much correct. Some of the ones u wrote is also used in Sana'anian accent, I just wrote the ones that came to my mind.
    The Island of Soqatra and some other parts of Hadhramaut, Ma'arb they speak an entirely different language as u said but most of them speak Arabic as well.

  13. #11
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    Ok, barak Allahu fik(i?) for these clarifications!
    You still live in Sana'a? it is a very beautiful city in my opinion, i love the architecture! so beautiful! some people say Paris is the most beautiful city in the world but they do not know Sana'a!!!
    I never went there though but I hope in sha Allah one day I would see the sunset in Sana'a!!!! <3

    Soqotra is very beautiful too! 37% of the plants there, 90% of the reptiles and 95% of the land snails who are living there, are exclusively on this island. A miracle of Allah!!!

    And is there a difference between the dialect you wrote and the one I did? I don't know for example, one is more used by rich people and the other by the poor, or one by the chistian or jews and the other by muslims, i don't know!
    But as you say they are both used in Sana'a I would like to know who speak like this and that!
    Last edited by WannaBFluent; 01-15-2014 at 12:45 PM.
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

  14. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    Wa'eeakom.. some neighborhoods have their own distinctive words which they use often. I think kids learn them from their streets at early age.

    I live currently outside but my family still in Yemen.

  15. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    I am having a hard time with your guide because I only know al-fuSHa pronunciation, and I don't know how spelling with Arabic transliteration works. Is there some place where I can learn that writing system, so I can understand how the words are pronounced in your guide? For instance, I have no idea which vowels are suppose to represent diphthongs, and short and long vowels.

    By the way, thank you for making this thread.

  16. #14
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcat15 View Post
    I am having a hard time with your guide because I only know al-fuSHa pronunciation, and I don't know how spelling with Arabic transliteration works. Is there some place where I can learn that writing system, so I can understand how the words are pronounced in your guide? For instance, I have no idea which vowels are suppose to represent diphthongs, and short and long vowels.

    By the way, thank you for making this thread.
    i don't understand. you know fu97a but you don't know how to read arabic script? anyway, if you want to learn how to read arabic script, check this out :
    https://ia601600.us.archive.org/11/i...ic-English.pdf

    if you want to learn about vowelization (tashkeel) check this out (not finished yet) :
    https://www.allthelyrics.com/forum/le...follow-me.html

    and for the vowels that do not exist in fu97a, for example the /é/ sound in syrian dialect, it is just a difference of pronunciation, the script does not change the vowel. for example this إ is /i/ in fu97a, but in syrian dialect, it can be /i/ or /é/. and أ is /a/ or /u/ in fu97a while in dialect it can be /a/ or /u/ or /e/ or /o/ it all depends on the word.

    hope this helps!
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to WannaBFluent For This Useful Post:
    oldcat15 (03-06-2014)

  18. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    Thank u. I won't mind putting what do u feel is right.

  19. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 13 Times in 6 Posts

    @oldcat15: My pleasure. Check WannaBFluent post below. It may help u.

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to Ash4u For This Useful Post:
    oldcat15 (03-06-2014)

  21. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    I can read Arabic script but I don't know how to write Arabic using the Latin alphabet. In my classes when we were learning how to read and write Arabic, we used textbooks that had no transliteration. My class learned pronunciation through dictation and listening to our teacher.

    WannaBFluent: That looks useful. Thanks. Most of it seems straightforward. It's mainly the compound vowels that I got confused about.

  22. #18
    ☼♛ATL-holic☂✌ aila's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Thanks
    378
    Thanked 288 Times in 245 Posts

    oldcat15: I guess u are not used with NUMBERS in Latin writing (heard the idea came when Arabs wanna type on their cellphones long time before the program has provided with Arabic writing system)

    2 for ( ء )... like in:
    su2al [سؤال] (=question)

    3 for ( ع )... like in:
    3arabi [عربي] (=Arab people)

    3' for ( غ )... like in:
    3'a2eb [غائب] (=absent)

    4 for ( ذ ) *rarely used... like in:
    ha4a [هذا] (=this)

    6 for ( ط )... like in:
    6abib [طبيب] (=medical doctor)

    6' for ( ظ )... like in:
    na6'ef [نظيف] (=clean)

    7 for ( ح )... like in:
    7ob [حب] (=love)

    7' @ 5 for ( خ )... like in:
    7'amsa @ 5amsa [خمسة] (=five)

    8 for ( ق ) *I met this mostly by gulf people [Kuwaitis, Iraqis, Bahrainis] in forum... like in:
    wara8a [ورقة] (=paper)

    9 for ( ص )... like in:
    9aba7 al 5eir [صباح الخير] (=good morning)...
    *except people in Maghreb countries [Tunisia, Al Jaza2er, Morocco] used it as ( ق )... like in:
    wara9a [ورقة] (=paper)

    '9 for ( ض )... like in:
    wa'9e7 [واضح] (=clear)

    poor "1" just left out its quite confusing at first, but i guess u will get use to it soon by practice
    Last edited by aila; 02-06-2014 at 09:30 AM.

  23. The Following User Says Thank You to aila For This Useful Post:
    oldcat15 (03-06-2014)

  24. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    can there be more posts? i'm of yemeni-hadrami descent and residing in Asia

  25. #20
    Senior Member WannaBFluent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 46 Times in 41 Posts

    if you speak yemeni arabic, feel free to contribute to this thread brother!
    العربية (arabic) // বাংলা (bengali) // हिन्दी (hindi) // kurmancî (kurdish) // فارسی (farsi)
    ਪੰਜਾਬੀ (punjabi) // soomaali (somali) // தமிழ் (tamil) // türkçe (turkish) // اُردو (urdu)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Learning Khaliji dialect
    By VivaPalestina in forum Learning Arabic language & Misc. translations
    Replies: 161
    Last Post: 12-13-2017, 02:27 AM
  2. Learning Lebanese dialect
    By jnvlv247 in forum Learning Arabic language & Misc. translations
    Replies: 1046
    Last Post: 03-23-2016, 09:26 AM
  3. Arwa songs in Yemeni dialect
    By princessjain in forum Arabic lyrics translation
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-10-2013, 10:02 PM
  4. Dan w Dana - Yemeni Dialect (I think)
    By 1inamillion1 in forum Arabic lyrics translation
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-13-2010, 03:28 AM
  5. Yemeni dialect translation
    By kaka in forum Learning Arabic language & Misc. translations
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-03-2010, 01:26 AM

Posting Permissions