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  1. #61
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogazici86 View Post
    yeees, I always like difficulties in my life. The things that compel me seems attractive to me, like greek and german! German has articles, too
    Haha, I like challenges and difficulties too, but in fact I hate german!!! I was learning many many years ago. I remember something, but very little things
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  2. #62
    Senior Member bogazici86's Avatar
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    The worst thing in german is pronunciation. It is awful I think.
    *Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises-----

  3. #63
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogazici86 View Post
    The worst thing in german is pronunciation. It is awful I think.
    You're right. It was the only language I was awful in pronunciation. Even turkish pronunciation is easier than german
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  4. #64
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    I have to say that this thread is really useful and it's great idea! I was learning Greek language for a while but I had to stop because of many comitments I have now! So, I want to ask you if you can translate something for me! That is the text from web site Gold the Club It would be great if someone do this for me because I am coming to Paralia Katerinis on 16th of July so I want to know the program of this club! Thank you in advance!

  5. #65
    Senior Member lesenna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogazici86 View Post
    Yeah I agree with you apollo. If I didn't like it, I wouldn't face with that terrible articles!
    Where are you from? Do you know greek?
    hehe Seda, u made me laugh about your fight with articles I can understand u coz turkish doesn't have them (but i remember there are some "alternatives" articles in turkish, like bir (a, one) and other suffixes those can work as definite articles and i fought with it too )
    My mother tongue, portuguese, has 8 articles (4 definite and 4 indefinite) and i can't understand such "neutral" articles, as greek and german have them
    Last edited by lesenna; 07-06-2007 at 06:53 PM.

  6. #66
    Senior Member lesenna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    Syllabification

    A syllable is part of word and comprises a single vowel or diphthong which may be accompanied by one or more consonants: ό-χι, αη-δό-νι, αρ-πά-χτη-καν, καη-μέ-νος.
    For the purposes of syllabification, vowel digraphs and spurious diphthongs count as single vowels: αί-μα, ναύ-της, ά-πια-στος, α-μυα-λιά, για-γιά, γυα-λιά.
    In normal speech, spurious diphthongs do not occur after two consonants of which the second is ρ. In these cases the two vowels may be treated as separate syllables: ά-γρι-ος, για-τρει-ά, μα-κρι-ά, χρει-ά-ζο-μαι.
    Depending on the number of syllables it has, a word is called:
    a) monosyllable, when it consists of a single syllable:ναι, μια
    b) disyllable, when it consists of two syllables: παί-ζω
    c) trisyllable, when it consists of three syllables: πα-τέ-ρας, τρα-γού-δι
    d) polysyllable when it consists of more than three syllables: α-νυ-πό-φο-ρος, α-κρι-βο-θώ-ρη-τος
    When a word has two or more syllables, the last syllable is called the final syllable, the second last the penultimate, the third last the antepenultimate and the fourth last is known as the syllable preceding the antepenultimate. The first syllable of a word is called the initial syllable.
    In the writing, it is often necessary to start a new line before finishing a word. The word must then be split into parts. But the break cannot be made just anywhere. It can only be made at the point where one syllable ends and the next syllable starts. The division of a word into syllables is called syllabification.
    The rules for syllabification are:
    1) A consonant between two vowels forms a syllable with the second vowel: έ-χω, κα-λο-σύ-νε-ψε.
    2) Two consonants between two vowels form a syllable with the second vowel if a Greek word start with two consonants: λά-σπη (σπίθα, σπέρνω), έ-βγαλα (βγαίνω), κο-φτερός (φτερό, φτωχός), έ-θνος (θνητός), έ-τσι (τσαγκάρης), τζί-τζικας (τζάμι, τζάκι), ύπο-πτος (πτώμα, πτώση), Αι-σχύλος (σχολείο, σχέδιο), ά-φθονος (φθόνος, φθορά).
    Otherwise the two consonants are separated: θάρ-ρος, άλ-λο, περ-πατώ, ερ-χομός, δάφ-νη, βαθ-μός.
    3) Three or more consonants between two vowels form a syllable with the second vowel if a Greek word can start with at least the first two consonants: ά-στρο (στρώνω), σφυρί-χτρα (χτένι), αι-σχρός (σχήμα).
    Otherwise the consonants are separated and the first forms a syllable with the preceding vowel: αμ-βροσία, άν-θρωπος, εκ-στρατεία, παν-στρατιά.
    4) Τhe digraphs μπ, ντ, γκ are not divided in syllabification: μπου-μπούκι, α-μπέλι, ντα-ντά, πέ-ντε, μπα-γκέτα, μου-γκρίζω.
    5) Vowel digraphs, diphthongs, spurious diphthongs and combinations αυ, ευ count in syllabification as single vowels: αί-μα, νε-ράι-δα, ά-πια-στος, ναύ-της.
    The same rules usually apply also to compound words.
    Maria, i couldn't understand why and what's the meaning of these words you've parenthesized in the examples u gave us in this post...

  7. #67
    Senior Member Nira Vancopoulos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    Ι see. Yes we can understand which is masculine, femenine or neutral from the endings and the articles. To tell the truth, it's difficult to learn which is masculine, femenine and neutral. Here in Greece I hear many foreign people who learn greek to make mistakes with this. But don't worry greeks too make mistakes. For example, the very common mistake that greeks make is that they believe that the word psifos is masculine cause it ends in -os, but in reality is feminine. I get really angry when I hear o psifos and not the correct i psifos...
    The same happens in spanish with the word "agua"... to many people thinks is femine cause ends with "a", so said "la agua" but the correct is "el agua" because is masculine.

    So, read that... in greek "o" is masculine and "i" is femine... and the ending "os" generally indicate the verb is masculine?... what ending indicate is femine?

    The clases are excelent, I congratulations you , you explain everything very well

    Bye
    アナタ の コエガ キキタクテ...
    Anata no koega kikitakute...
    ヌクモリ フレタクテ...
    nukumori furetakute...
    アナタエノ オモイ コミアゲテ クル
    anataeno omoi komiagete kuru

  8. #68
    Junior Member Apollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogazici86 View Post
    The worst thing in german is pronunciation. It is awful I think.
    Like grinding stones with your teeth.

  9. #69
    Junior Member Apollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    This thread has nothing to do with lyrics, but with greek grammar. So if anyone has any questions or wants to learn the greek grammar, this is the best place. (I'm sorry for creating this thread here, but I didn't know where to place it!)
    Please don't be sorry.
    this is also a part of the lyrics.
    keep it coming dear it's never enough.

  10. #70
    Junior Member Apollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogazici86 View Post
    Yeah I agree with you apollo. If I didn't like it, I wouldn't face with that terrible articles!
    Where are you from? Do you know greek?
    As maria_gr (Maria THE GREAT) mentioned I'm from Israel.
    I'm learning it here. It's a great place to do so, the Friends
    here are more then willing to help. And I found that through
    the lyrics and songs it's easier.

  11. #71
    Senior Member bogazici86's Avatar
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    Yes listening to songs help me while learning a language. As you said, all the friend are willing to help here and because of this I love here soo much. I have good friends, I am happy
    *Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises-----

  12. #72
    Senior Member bogazici86's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lesenna View Post
    hehe Seda, u made me laugh about your fight with articles I can understand u coz turkish doesn't have them (but i remember there are some "alternatives" articles in turkish, like bir (a, one) and other suffixes those can work as definite articles and i fought with it too )
    My mother tongue, portuguese, has 8 articles (4 definite and 4 indefinite) and i can't understand such "neutral" articles, as greek and german have them
    But most languages have that kind of indefinite articles, it's not special to turkish, Maybe there are some exceptions in general in turkish but I think it is easier than greek! Your language is good because there are no neutrals, so the one who wants to learn your language will not deal with neutrals!
    *Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises-----

  13. #73
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lesenna View Post
    Maria, i couldn't understand why and what's the meaning of these words you've parenthesized in the examples u gave us in this post...
    Lessena mou, I put these examples only for the pronunciation and not for the meaning, but If you want to learn it, then i suppose that i have to make a list. I'll translate them and i'll post it here.
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by psonja View Post
    I have to say that this thread is really useful and it's great idea! I was learning Greek language for a while but I had to stop because of many comitments I have now! So, I want to ask you if you can translate something for me! That is the text from web site Gold the Club It would be great if someone do this for me because I am coming to Paralia Katerinis on 16th of July so I want to know the program of this club! Thank you in advance!
    Psonja mou it says that the site is under construction. I cannot translate anything now... I'm sorry
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  15. #75
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nira Vancopoulos View Post
    The same happens in spanish with the word "agua"... to many people thinks is femine cause ends with "a", so said "la agua" but the correct is "el agua" because is masculine.

    So, read that... in greek "o" is masculine and "i" is femine... and the ending "os" generally indicate the verb is masculine?... what ending indicate is femine?

    The clases are excelent, I congratulations you , you explain everything very well

    Bye
    Yes, it happens and in "mano", "tema", "alma", "problema" and many other words.

    So in greek there is a category of exception in which the femenin end in -os like "i psifos", "i odos" etc.

    I'll say later more about nouns cause i have a scedule in my mind and i don't want to ruin it...
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  16. #76
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    ACCENTUATION

    Accents*

    In every word with two or more syllables, one syllable is pronounced with more emphasis than the others: παιδί, γράφω, άνθρωπος, σιδηρόδρομος, μήλο, ναύτες.
    A small mark called accent is written above the vowel in this syllable. The accent which is used is the (ancient Greek) acute: κήπος, γερός, αγαπούμε.
    Monosyllables are generally not accented.
    Within a word the accent may occur only on one of the last three syllables: αγαπώ, αγαπούσα, αγαπούσαμε.
    This rule also applies to words with a diphthong or spurious diphthong, such as νεράιδα, εννιάμερα, βράδιασε. This is cause a diphthong constitutes a single syllable, and a spurious diphthong has two vowels only on the paper.

    Base accent

    In words that are inflected, the accent does not always remain on the same syllable: ο άγγελος – του αγγέλου – τον άγγελο, η μοίρα – των μοιρών – τις μοίρες, δένω – έδενα – θα δεθώ.
    The base accent of nouns is the accent of the nominative singular (ο άγγελος);of adjectives, the accent of the nominative singular masculine (ο ωραίος); Of verbs, the accent of the first person singular of the present indicative (δένω).

    *Prior to the orthographical reform of 1982 three different written accents were used: the acute (&#180, the grave (`) and the circumflex (~). Today the acute is used in place of all of these accents.
    These three marks indicated exactly the same kind of accent, that is, which syllable in the word received the most stress. In ancient Greek, however, there was a difference between them in pronunciation. Ancient Greek accents were musical. The acute accent indicated a rising tone, a grave indicated the absence of a high tone and the tone first rose and then fell on a vowel with a circumflex accent (´`)

    Orthography rules of the monotonic system

    An accent is written on every word that has two or more syllables. This applies even when a word appears to be a monosyllable following elision or apocope, but not when it loses its accented vowel through prodelision:
    a) The accent is retained on words which appear to be monosyllables following:
    Elision: λίγ’ απ’ όλα, πάντ’ ανοιχτά, είν’ ανάγκη, ήρθ’ εκείνος, μήτ’ εσύ μήτ’ εγώ etc.
    Apocope: φέρ’ το, κόψ’ τους, άσ’ τον etc.
    b) When a verb form loses its accented syllable through prodelision, the written accent is not shifted back to the preceding word: μου ‘φερε, τα ‘δειξε, να ‘λεγε, θα ‘θελα, μου ‘πε, που ‘ναι (but πού ‘ναι) etc.
    Monosyllables are not written with an accent.
    a) Forms exhibiting synizesis (two vowels pronounced together as a single syllable) are regarded as monosyllables and remain unaccented, e.g. μια, για, γεια, πια, πιο, ποιος – ποια – ποιο, γιος, νιος, (να) πιω. Note the difference between the followings: μια – μία, δυο – δύο, ποιον – (το) ποιόν, το βιος – ο βίος.
    b) Monosyllabic imperatives, even when followed by two enclitics, are not written with an accent: πες μου το, δες του τα, βρες τους την, φα του τα etc.
    The following exceptions are written with an accent:
    a) The disjunctive conjunction ή (“or”): Ή η Άννα ή η Μαρία.
    b) The interrogative adverbs πού (“where”) and πώς (“how”) are written with an accent in direct and indirect questions: Πού πήγες; Δε μας είπες πού πήγες. –Πώς σε λένε; Μας είπε πώς τον λένε.
    Πού and πώς are also written with an accent in cases such as the following: πού να σου τα λέω – από πού κι ως πού – πού και πού – αραιά και πού – Τους έστειλες το γράμμα; Πώς! – Πώς βαριέμαι! – Κοιτάζω πώς να τα βολέψω.
    Που and πως are written without an accent when they are not interrogative (Που when it’s a relative adverb, pronoun or conjunction, and πως when it’s a conjunction), e.g. Αυτό που σου είπα. Μας είπε πως τον λένε Βασίλη.
    c) Weak forms of the personal pronoun (μου, σου, του, της, τον, την, το, μας, σας, τους, τα) are written with an accent when there is a possibility that they may be read as enclitics: ο πατέρας μού είπε (=the father said to me), but ο πατέρας μου είπε (=my father said), η δασκάλα μάς τα έδωσε (=our teacher gave them to us), but η δασκάλα μας τα έδωσε (our teacher gave them).
    But when there is no possibility that a weak form of the personal pronoun will be confused with its corresponding homophone enclitic, it is written without any accent: γιατί μας τα λες αυτά; (why are you telling to us these?) - τι μας έστειλες; (what did you send to us?) - όταν μας τα έστειλες (when you send them to us) – η δασκάλα που μας έστειλαν (the teacher that they send to us) etc.
    Monosyllables coupled in pronunciation with any person or number of verb forms μπω, βγω, βρω, ‘ρθω
    An accent is written on the final syllable of a proparaxytone word when it carries the accent of a following enclitic: ο πρόεδρός μας, χάρισμά σου, άφησέ του το etc.
    An accent is similarly written on the first of two enclitics that are preceded by a paraxytone imperative: δώσε μού το etc.

    Naming of words after their accented syllable

    According to the syllable on which they are accented, words are described as:
    a) Oxytone – final syllable accented:εμπρός, γιατί, τα μικρά παιδιά.
    b) Paroxytone – penultimate syllable accented: τρέχω, δρόμος.
    c) Proparoxytone – antepenultimate syllable accented: άνθρωπος, γυμναστήριο.

    *Historical note – The conventional form of the written language prior to the orthographical reform of 1982 included the use of the two brethings, the rough breathing (‘) and the smooth breathing (’).
    In Ancient Greek the difference between the two breathings was significant. The rough breathing was used quite early to represent an aspirate sound like Modern Greek [χ] without the tongue touching the palate (bot unlike Enlish [h]). This sound occurred mostly before the initial vowel. A smooth breathing indicated the absence of a rough breathing.

    Accent position

    Accents are written in the following positions:
    a) Single small vowels – above the vowel: εγώ, τιμώ.
    b) Initial capital vowels – in the upper position and to the left of the capital vowel: Έλληνας, Ήπειρος, Όλυμπος, Έβρος.
    c) Diphthongs – above the vowel that is pronounced with greater emphasis: νεράιδα.
    d) Vowel digraphs, the combinations αυ, ευ and spurious diphthongs – above the second vowel: πούλησα, αύριο, είμαι, εύλογος, πιάνω, μοιάζω.

    Unaccented or proclitic words

    Certain monosyllables are pronounced so closely with the following word that they have no accent of their own. Examples include articles, weak forms of personal pronouns, many prepositions and particles. These monosyllables are called unaccented or proclitic words.

    Enclitics

    Certain monosyllables are pronounced so closely with the word preceding them that their accent is either not heard at all (το βιβλίο μου) or is heard on the final syllable of the preceding word, which thus acquires a second accent (το τετράδιό μου).
    Monosyllables which lose their accent in this way or transfer it to the final syllable of the preceding word are called encltics.
    The common enclitics are the monosyllabic forms of the personal pronoun: μου – με – μας, σου – σε – σας, τος – τον – τοι – τη – τες etc.
    The disyllabic pronouns τονε, τηνε are also enclitic. Certain trisyllabic verb forms can also become enclitic when their initial vowel forms a diphthong with the final vowel of the preceding word: σαν να ήτανε – σαν να ητανε.
    Although they may give the impression of being accented on their antepenultimate syllable, proparoxytones with a spurious diphthong on their final syllable do not acquire a second accent: τα χωράφια μας, η αρρώστια σου, έννοια σου, - but: βοήθειά σας, το βασίλειό μας. In some instances both pronunciation can occur: τα δάκρυα σου – τα δάκρυά σου, με τον άγριο σου τρόπο – με τον άγριό σου τρόπο.

    The accent of an enclitic:

    1. Is transferred:
    a) To the final syllable of the preceding word when this is accented on its antepenultimate syllable: ο πρόεδρός μας (σας, τους).
    b) To the preceding word when this is also enclitic and is itself preceding by a paroxytone: φέρε μού το, δώσε μάς το.
    2. Is lost when the preceding word is accented on its final or its penultimate syllable: το φως μου, η χαρά μου, να τους, τα δώρα του, οι φίλοι σας.
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

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  18. #77
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    OTHER ORTHOGRAPHICAL MARKS
    PUNCTUATION – ABBREVIATIONS

    Other orthographical marks

    In addition to accents, other orthographical marks are used in writing Greek. These are the apostrophe, the comma, the dieresis, the hyphen and the punctuation marks.

    A. The apostrophe (’) is written in place of the vowel that is lost in cases of elision, prodelision and apocope.
    B. The apostrophe (’) is written above the vowel that results from the process of vowel reduction in cases of crasis.
    C. The comma is used in writing the relative pronoun ό,τι to distinguish it from the complementiser ότι: «είδα τότε ότι ό,τι κάμομε θα το κάμομε μονάχοι και δεν έχουμε ελπίδα καμία από τους ξένους.» (=I saw then that what you have to do, you’ll do it by ourselves and that we don’t have any hope from the strangers.)
    The comma is also used: a) in the temporal conjunction ό,τι: το έμαθε ό,τι βγήκε, and b) in decimal numbers to separate whole numbers from fractions: 15,3656.
    D. The dieresis consists of two dots which, when written above the ι or the υ of vowel digraphs αι, ει, οι, υι, ου or the combinations αυ, ευ, indicate that the two vowels should be pronounced separately: χαϊδεύω (haidévo), θεϊκός (theikós), καταπραϋντικός (katapraintikós), ξεϋφαίνω (xeiféno), μυϊκός (miikós).
    *ORTHOGRAPHY: The dieresis is written above ι or the υ when it follows an unaccented α, ε, ο, υ and doesn’t form a digraph with it.
    E. The hyphen is used to join words or syllables. It is wriiten:
    1. At the end of a line, when the whole of a word doesn’t fit and it has to be split across two lines: μαλ-λιά.
    2. After prosthetic Αγια-, Αϊ-, γερο-, γρια-, θεια-, κυρα-, μαστρο-, μπαρμπα-, χατζη-, used as determiners of a proper noun (baptismal or family name): της Αγια-Σοφιάς, του Αϊ-Λιά, της κυρα-Ρήνης, του παπα-Δημήτρη etc.
    Prosthetic words are written without an accent when they are joined by a hyphen to the following noun. Forms that have become established compounds, such as Μαστρογιώργης, Μπαρμαγιάννης, γεροβασιλιάς etc, can also be written as a single word.
    3. In listing the stages of an itinerary: Η γραμμή Θεσσαλονίκης-Γεβγελής. Θα κάνουμε το ταξίδι Αθήνα-Πάτρα. (=The line Thessaloniki-Yievyieli. We’ll do the trip Athens-Patra).
    4. Sometimes in place of και (“and”) in the names of partnerships, businesses etc: Χατζηνικολάου-Γεωργίου και Σία.
    5. In certain compounds borrowed from other languages, in which the Greek form preserves the double stress of the original: γουότερ-πόλο (=water polo).
    There is no reason to use a hyphen in words that occur in the spoken language only as compounds, such as γαλλοελληνικός (French-Greek).
    The hyphen shouldn’t be confused with the dash (-).
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

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  20. #78
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    USEFUL WORDS AND FRASES
    Γεια*/Γεια σου/Γεια σας= Hello (yiá/yiá sou/yiá sas)
    Καλημέρα= Good morning (kaliméra)
    Καλό μεσημέρι= Good noon (kaló mesiméri)
    Καλό απόγευμα= Good afternoon (kaló apóyievma)
    Καλησπέρα= Good evening (kalispéra)
    Καλό βράδυ= Good evening (kaló vrádi)
    Καληνύχτα= Good night (kaliníhta)
    Καλό Σαββατοκύριακο= Good weekend (kaló Savatokíriako)
    Ευχαριστώ= Thanks (efharistó)
    Σ’ ευχαριστώ= Thank you (s' efharistó)
    Παρακαλώ= You’re welcome (parakaló)
    Δεν πειράζει= Never mind (den pirázi)
    Δεν κάνει τίποτα= It’s nothing (den káni típota)
    Όχι= No (óhi)
    Ναι= Yes (ne)
    Εντάξει= OK (endáksi)
    Πώς είσαι;= How are you? (pos íse)
    Καλά!= Fine! (kalá)
    Είμαι πολύ καλά!= I’m very well! (íme polí kalá)
    Τι κάνεις;= What are you doing? (ti kánis)
    Τίποτα= Nothing (típota)
    Συγγνώμη= I’m sorry (signómi)
    Το ξέρω= I know it (to kséro)
    Δεν το ξέρω= I don’t know it (den to kséro)
    Κατάλαβα= I understood (katálava)
    Δεν κατάλαβα= I didn’t understand (den katálava)
    Γεια/Αντίο= Goodbye (yiá/adío)
    Τα λέμε= See you (ta léme)
    Σ’ αγαπώ= I love you (s' agapó)
    Σ’ αγαπώ πάρα πολύ= I love you very much (s' agapó pára polí)
    Σε λατρεύω= I adore you (se latrévo)
    Σε θέλω= I want you (se thélo)
    Μου λείπεις= I miss you (mou lípis)
    Αγάπη μου= My love (agápi mou)
    Μωρό μου= My baby (moró mou)
    Γλυκιά μου/Γλυκιέ μου= My sweetie (glikiá mou/glikié mou)
    Ζωή μου= My life (zoí mou)
    Ομορφιά μου= My beautiful (omorfiá mou)
    Καρδιά μου= My heart (kardiá mou)
    Ψυχή μου= My soul (psihí mou)
    Μάτια μου= My eyes (mátia mou)
    Φως μου= My light (fos mou)
    Θησαυρέ μου= My treasure (thisavré mou)
    Είσαι πολύ όμορφη/όμορφος= You’re very beautiful (íse polí ómorfi/ómorfos)
    -Πώς σε/σας λένε;= What’s your name? (pos se/sas léne)
    -Με λένε .../Ονομάζομαι .../Το όνομά μου είναι ...= My name is … (me léne/onomázome/to ónomá mou íne)

    -Από που είσαι;= Where are you from? (apó pou íse)
    -Είμαι από ... = I’m from … (íme apó)

    -Πού μένεις;= Where do you live? (poú ménis)
    -Μένω στο/στη ... = I live in … (méno sto/sti)

    -Πόσο χρονών είσαι;= How old are you? (póso hronón íse)
    -Είμαι ... χρονών= I’m … years old (íme ... hronón)

    Καλός/καλή/καλό= Good (kalós/kalí/kaló)
    Καλά= Well (kalá)
    Κακός/κακιά/κακό= Bad (kakós/kakiá/kakó)
    Κακά/κακώς= badly (kaká/kakós)
    Τι;= What? (ti)
    Πού;= Where? (poú)
    Πώς;= How? (pós)
    Γιατί;= Why? (yiatí)
    Επειδή ... = Because … (epidí)
    Ίσως= Maybe (ísos)
    Χθες= Yesterday (hthes)
    Σήμερα= Today (símera)
    Απόψε= Tonight (apópse)
    Αύριο= Tomorrow (ávrio)
    Μεθαύριο= The day after tomorrow (methávrio)
    Έλα= Come (éla)
    Φύγε= Go (fíyie)
    Άσε με= Leave me (áse me)
    Πού είσαι;= Where are you? (poú íse)
    Φίλος/φίλη= Friend (fílos/fíli)
    Κολλητός/κολλητή= Best friend (kolitós/kolití)
    Φίλε μου/φίλη μου= My friend (fíle mou/fíli mou)
    Κολλητέ μου/κολλητή μου= My best friend (kolité mou/kolití mou)
    Βρέφος= Baby (vréfos)
    Μωρό= Baby (moró)
    Νήπιο= Infant (nípio)
    Παιδί= child (pedí)
    Κορίτσι/κοπέλα= Girl (korítsi/kopéla)
    Αγόρι= Boy (agóri)
    Νεαρός/νεαρή= Youngster (nearós/nearí)
    Εφηβος/έφηβη= Teenager (éfivos/éfivi)
    Ανήλικος/ανήλικη=Under age (anílikos/aníliki)
    Ενήλικος/ενήλικη= Adult (enílikos/eníliki)
    Δεσποινίς= Miss (despinís)
    Κύριος/κυρία= Mr/Mrs (kírios/kiría)
    Άνδρας= Man (ándras)
    Γυναίκα= Woman (yinéka)
    Ηλικιωμένος/ηλικιωμένη= Elder (ilikioménos/ilikioméni)
    Καλή τύχη= Good luck (kalí tíhi)
    Τι ώρα είναι;= What time is it? (ti óra íne)
    Ελλάς= Hellas (elás)
    Ελλάδα= Greece (eláda)
    Ελληνική Δημοκρατία= Greek Republic (elinikí dimokratía)
    Έλληνας= Greek (man) (élinas)
    Ελληνίδα= Greek (woman) (elinída)
    Ελληνικό= Greek (neuter) (elinikó)
    Ελληνικά= Greek (language) (eliniká)
    Τουρκία= Turkey (tourkía)
    Τούρκικα= Turkish (toúrkika)
    Βραζιλία= Brazil (vrazilía)
    Βραζιλιάνικα= Brazilian (vraziliánika)
    Αγγλία= England (agklía)
    Αγγλικά= English (agkliká)
    Γαλλία= France (galía)
    Γαλλικά= French (galiká)
    Ισπανία= Spain (ispanía)
    Ισπανικά= Spanish (ispaniká)
    Κύπρος= Cyprus (kípros)

    *The word "Γεια" comes from the word "υγεία" which means health. So, "Γεια" is some kind of wish, "to be healthy".
    Last edited by maria_gr; 07-17-2007 at 01:54 AM.
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  21. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to maria_gr For This Useful Post:
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  22. #79
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    PERSONAL PRONOUNS
    Εγώ= I (egó)
    Εσύ= You (esí)
    Αυτός/αυτή/αυτό= He/she/it (aftós/aftí/aftó)
    Εμείς= We (emís)
    Εσείς= You (esís)
    Αυτοί/αυτές/αυτά= They (aftí/aftés/aftá)

    FORMATION OF PERSONAL PRONOUN
    1rst person
    Strong
    Singular
    Nom. εγώ
    Gen. εμένα
    Acc. εμένα
    Voc. ------
    Plural
    Nom. εμείς
    Gen. εμάς
    Acc. εμάς
    Voc. ------

    1rst person
    Weak
    Singular
    Nom. ------
    Gen. μου
    Acc. με
    Voc. ------
    Plural
    Nom. ------
    Gen. μας
    Acc. μας
    Voc. ------

    2nd person
    Strong
    Singular
    Nom. εσύ
    Gen. εσένα
    Acc. εσένα
    Voc. εσύ
    Plural
    Nom. εσείς
    Gen. εσάς
    Acc. εσάς
    Voc. εσείς

    2nd person
    Weak
    Singular
    Nom. ------
    Gen. σου
    Acc. σε
    Voc. ------
    Plural
    Nom. ------
    Gen. σας
    Acc. σας
    Voc. ------

    3rd person
    Strong
    Singular
    Masculine
    Nom. αυτός
    Gen. αυτού
    Acc. αυτόν
    Plural
    Nom. αυτοί
    Gen. αυτών
    Acc. αυτούς

    3rd person
    Weak
    Singular
    Masculine
    Nom. τος
    Gen. του
    Acc. τον
    Plural
    Νom. τοι
    Gen. τους
    Acc. τους

    3rd person
    Strong
    Singular
    Feminine
    Νom. αυτή
    Gen. αυτής
    Acc. αυτή(ν)
    Plural
    Νom. αυτές
    Gen. αυτών
    Acc. αυτές

    3rd person
    Weak
    Singular
    Feminine
    Νom. τη
    Gen. της
    Acc. τη(ν)
    Plural
    Νom. τες
    Gen. τους
    Acc. τις (τες)

    3rd person
    Strong
    Singular
    Neuter
    Νom. αυτό
    Gen. αυτού
    Acc. αυτό
    Plural
    Νom. αυτά
    Gen. αυτών
    Acc. αυτά

    3rd person
    Weak
    Singular
    Neuter
    Νom. το
    Gen. του
    Acc. το
    Plural
    Νom. τα
    Gen. τους
    Acc. τα
    Last edited by maria_gr; 07-17-2007 at 04:38 AM.
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

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  24. #80
    Senior Member bogazici86's Avatar
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    maria mou, thank you so much. This is very very helpful
    *Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises-----

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