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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    @pitbull_toma: I moved your post here cause "learning bulgarian" thread wasn't appropriate for your request. I'm not spanish but i know quite well and I can help you a little bit with simple things like the pronunciation, conjugation of the verbs etc.
    i can help you with some greetings

    Que onda-Mexico/chicano
    Que transa-Mexico(i think)/Chicano
    Que la que hay-Puerto Rico
    Que lo que (my favorite)-Dominican Republic*
    Que bola-pretty sure this one is Cuban
    Que pasa isn't used normally, but is still ok to say
    Que pasó means what happened. That was is important to know


    *note: que lo que is abbreviated as k lo k, or more commonly just klk.

  2. #22
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    I totally forgot that there was a similar thread about spanish grammar. So this thread might be useful to you as well.

    and xiurell teach us some catalan. Ok you know that I can understand, but i want to speak (vull parlar català )

    Gràcies
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  3. #23
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    I totally forgot that there was a similar thread about spanish grammar. So this thread might be useful to you as well.

    and xiurell teach us some catalan. Ok you know that I can understand, but i want to speak (vull parlar català )

    Gràcies
    Γεια σου Μαρία

    Segur que si t´ho proposes ho acabaràs xerrant
    Bon cap de setmana, amiga meva

  4. #24
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    let's star with the verb SER TO BE

    Although it is an extremely common verb, ser can be confusing for many Spanish students because it is usually translated as "to be," same as the verb estar. Although they can often be translated the same way, ser and estar are distinct verbs with distinct meanings and are seldom synonymous.

    It is probably most helpful to learn the two verbs separately

    Here are the main uses of ser:

    - To indicate existence: Ser o no ser (to be or not to be)
    - With adjectives to indicate inherent, innate or essential characteristics
    La casa es grande. (The house is big.)
    Soy feliz. (I am happy)
    - To indicate origin, nature or identity: Soy de Argentina. (I am from Argentina.)
    - To indicate possession or ownership : El coche es mío ((The car is mine.)
    - To tell the time: Es la una. (It is 1:00.) Son las dos. (It is 2:00.)
    - To indicate where an event takes place: El concierto es en la playa. (The concert is on the beach.) La fiesta será en mi casa. (The party will be at my house.)

    - In impersonal statements: Es importante. (It is important.) Fue difícil. (It was difficult.)

    Present
    yo soy ...................................(I am)
    tú eres ..................................(you are)
    él, ella, usted es.................... (he is, she is, you are
    nosotros, nosotras somos.... (we are)
    vosotros, vosotras sois......... (you are)
    ellos, ellas, ustedes son........ (they are, you are) were)

    As you see is an irregular verb

    Notice how in Spanish the verb ending identifies the subject, except when using a third person, in which case we have several possibilities. In those cases you will find that either the subject is identified through the use of the personal pronoun or name, or it has been identified in a previous sentence

    To make the negative form of the verb you must add no before the verb

    Yo no soy (I am not)
    no eres (you are not)
    etc.

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  6. #25
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    María, you can apply the same rules por the Catalan

    The verb SER or ÉSSER

    PRESENT

    Jo sóc (here on the islands we say som
    tu ets
    Ell/ella/vostè és
    Nosaltres som (we say noltros(masculine)/noltres(femenine)
    Vosaltres sou (we say voltros/voltres)
    Ell/elles/vostès són

    And the negative form you must and no before the verb

    Jo no sóc
    tu no ets
    etc

    When addressing a friend, child or relative in Catalan the second person singular and plural forms are used. When addressing someone who does not fall into these categories a polite form is used: vostè and the plural vostès. These take the third person singular and plural forms of a verb.

    It will be a bilingual lesson as I am
    Last edited by xiurell; 06-13-2008 at 11:48 AM.

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    Lunita (06-22-2009)

  8. #26
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    Γεια σου Μαρία

    Segur que si t´ho proposes ho acabaràs xerrant
    Bon cap de setmana, amiga meva
    Jaja no sé, potser, però vull parlar molt ben aviat!

    Que tinguis tu també un bon cap de setmana amigo.

    Edit: Gràcies per la lliçó!
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    Jaja no sé, potser, però vull parlar molt ben aviat!

    Que tinguis tu també un bon cap de setmana amigo.

    Edit: Gràcies per la lliçó!
    what language is that? Portuguese?

  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    what language is that? Portuguese?
    It's Catalan!
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  11. #29
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    can anyone translate this ? "Ya es tarde pero palante uno sufre un dia pero el otro yora pero mientras pasan los dias uno se resigna poko a poko"

    i know it syas sumthing aobout its almost afternooon, but it goes on or sumthing then lttle of little or sumthing?
    lol im just learning spanish so itdll b a big help thnx =)

  12. #30
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    "Ya es tarde pero para adelante, uno sufre un día pero el otro llora pero mientras pasan los días, uno se resigna poco a poco"

    Now is late but go on, one day you can suffer and on the other day, cry but as the days go by, you rising yourself little by little (gradually)

    la tarde = the afternoon
    tarde (adv.)= late

  13. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by maria_gr View Post
    It's Catalan!
    oh, it looks like portuguese. i guess it's because this character - ç. What sound does that make?

  14. #32
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    oh, it looks like portuguese. i guess it's because this character - ç. What sound does that make?

    Catalan pronunciation


    · A - When stressed always has an open sound between the sound of the a in bat or father. Examples: pa (bread), mà (hand), pare (father).Unstressed sounds like the a in sugar or the e in butter. Examples: porta (door), roba (clothes), dona (woman).
    · B - sounds like the b in bar. Bonic (pretty), també (also, too), balcó (balcony)
    · C - Before e or i sounds like the c in acid. Examples: cel (sky), cita (appointment).In almost all other cases sounds like the c in cat. Examples: poc (little, not much), casa (house).
    · Ç – Like s Examples: cançó (song), començar (to start)
    · D - like the d in door. Examples: divendres (Friday), demà (tomorrow).
    · E - Open e is like the e in set. Examples: cel (sky), nen (child), cafè (coffee). Closed e is like the e in they without the final gliding sound. Examples: llengua (language), llet (milk), carrer (street). Unstressed e is like the e in butter and sounds just like unstressed a. Examples: mare (mother), jove (young). Unstressed e before a sounds like a closed e. Examples: teatre (theater), real (real).
    · F - like the f in far. Examples: família (family), estufa (heater).
    · G - With an a, o, u, r, or l at the beginning of a word or after n, sounds like g in get. Examples: gos (dog), gana (hunger).
    · H - Always silent
    · I - like the i in marine
    · J -like the s in measure or vision. Examples: jove (young), netejar (to clean).
    · K - Only appears in assimilated foreign words. Always sounds like the k in kitten
    · L - like the l in love
    · L.L - as two ls. Examples: mal·leable (malleable), idíl·lic (idyllic).
    · LL - like the lli in the word million
    · M - like the m in mother
    · N – like n in noun
    · NY – like the spanish ñ Example: Espanya (Spain)
    · O - Open is like the o in coffee. Examples: bo (good), allò (that). Closed is like the o in note without the final glide. Examples: cançó (song), boca (mouth).Unstressed is between the oo in boot and foot. Examples: potser (maybe), comprar (to buy).
    · P- like p in pain
    · Q- like k
    · R – as in Spanish has two sounds, one strong Rosa (Rose) and the other weak Però (but)
    · S – like s in sound. Dissabte (Saturday). Like z in zoo. Rosa (rose)
    · T – like t in time
    · U – like the u in rude
    · W - Only appears in assimilated foreign words
    · X – like ch in champagne
    · Y - Only appears in assimilated foreign words. (For ny see n.)
    · Z - Pronounced like the z in zebra. Examples: zèfir (zephyr), zel (zeal), zona (zone).

  15. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post

    Catalan pronunciation


    · A - When stressed always has an open sound between the sound of the a in bat or father. Examples: pa (bread), mà (hand), pare (father).Unstressed sounds like the a in sugar or the e in butter. Examples: porta (door), roba (clothes), dona (woman).
    · B - sounds like the b in bar. Bonic (pretty), també (also, too), balcó (balcony)
    · C - Before e or i sounds like the c in acid. Examples: cel (sky), cita (appointment).In almost all other cases sounds like the c in cat. Examples: poc (little, not much), casa (house).
    · Ç – Like s Examples: cançó (song), començar (to start)
    · D - like the d in door. Examples: divendres (Friday), demà (tomorrow).
    · E - Open e is like the e in set. Examples: cel (sky), nen (child), cafè (coffee). Closed e is like the e in they without the final gliding sound. Examples: llengua (language), llet (milk), carrer (street). Unstressed e is like the e in butter and sounds just like unstressed a. Examples: mare (mother), jove (young). Unstressed e before a sounds like a closed e. Examples: teatre (theater), real (real).
    · F - like the f in far. Examples: família (family), estufa (heater).
    · G - With an a, o, u, r, or l at the beginning of a word or after n, sounds like g in get. Examples: gos (dog), gana (hunger).
    · H - Always silent
    · I - like the i in marine
    · J -like the s in measure or vision. Examples: jove (young), netejar (to clean).
    · K - Only appears in assimilated foreign words. Always sounds like the k in kitten
    · L - like the l in love
    · L.L - as two ls. Examples: mal·leable (malleable), idíl·lic (idyllic).
    · LL - like the lli in the word million
    · M - like the m in mother
    · N – like n in noun
    · NY – like the spanish ñ Example: Espanya (Spain)
    · O - Open is like the o in coffee. Examples: bo (good), allò (that). Closed is like the o in note without the final glide. Examples: cançó (song), boca (mouth).Unstressed is between the oo in boot and foot. Examples: potser (maybe), comprar (to buy).
    · P- like p in pain
    · Q- like k
    · R – as in Spanish has two sounds, one strong Rosa (Rose) and the other weak Però (but)
    · S – like s in sound. Dissabte (Saturday). Like z in zoo. Rosa (rose)
    · T – like t in time
    · U – like the u in rude
    · W - Only appears in assimilated foreign words
    · X – like ch in champagne
    · Y - Only appears in assimilated foreign words. (For ny see n.)
    · Z - Pronounced like the z in zebra. Examples: zèfir (zephyr), zel (zeal), zona (zone).
    so it's really close to spanish, with a little bit of english (i.e. the z)

  16. #34
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    THE VERB 'ESTAR'

    PRESENT


    Yo estoy
    Tú estás
    Él/Ella está
    NOS. estamos
    VOS. estáís
    Ellos/as están

    Here are the main uses of estar:

    -To indicate a state or condition, often one resulting from a change:
    estoy enfermo (I'm sick)
    -To indicate location
    Estamos en casa (we are at home)
    -With a present participle to form a progressive tense
    Están comiendo (They are eating)

    SER VS. ESTAR

    As in English both verbs mean "to be" (as in greek too)
    I try esplain the difference of use with some exemples
    Ser tells you what something is, the nature of its being, while estar refers more to what something does.

    I'm sick
    (correct)- estoy enfermo
    (incorrect) - soy enfermo (That would refer to who I am, to the nature of my being. We might translate that as "I am a sick person" or "I am sickly."

    -Está cansada, She is tired. Es una cansada, she is a tired person
    -Estoy feliz, I'm happy now. Soy feliz, I am happy by nature

    One way of thinking about it is to think of ser as being roughly equivalent to "equals." Another way of thinking about it is that estar often refers to a temporary condition, while ser frequently refers to a permanent condition.

    But there are some exceptions and also a few idiomatic expressions that simply need to be learned.

  17. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    THE VERB 'ESTAR'

    PRESENT


    Yo estoy
    Tú estás
    Él/Ella está
    NOS. estamos
    VOS. estáís
    Ellos/as están

    Here are the main uses of estar:

    -To indicate a state or condition, often one resulting from a change:
    estoy enfermo (I'm sick)
    -To indicate location
    Estamos en casa (we are at home)
    -With a present participle to form a progressive tense
    Están comiendo (They are eating)

    SER VS. ESTAR

    As in English both verbs mean "to be" (as in greek too)
    I try esplain the difference of use with some exemples
    Ser tells you what something is, the nature of its being, while estar refers more to what something does.

    I'm sick
    (correct)- estoy enfermo
    (incorrect) - soy enfermo (That would refer to who I am, to the nature of my being. We might translate that as "I am a sick person" or "I am sickly."

    -Está cansada, She is tired. Es una cansada, she is a tired person
    -Estoy feliz, I'm happy now. Soy feliz, I am happy by nature

    One way of thinking about it is to think of ser as being roughly equivalent to "equals." Another way of thinking about it is that estar often refers to a temporary condition, while ser frequently refers to a permanent condition.

    But there are some exceptions and also a few idiomatic expressions that simply need to be learned.
    one of the things we learned in spanish class for estar is P.L.A.C.E. Basically, if it's place, location, action, condition, or emotion, you would use estar, anything else is ser. i didn't really need that, since i just figure, if it's permanent, use ser, if it's temporary use estar and the only exception is death.

  18. #36
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    one of the things we learned in spanish class for estar is P.L.A.C.E. Basically, if it's place, location, action, condition, or emotion, you would use estar, anything else is ser. i didn't really need that, since i just figure, if it's permanent, use ser, if it's temporary use estar and the only exception is death.
    Very useful the P.L.A.C.E. trick, but doesn't always work, look at this sentences:

    El espejo está roto (permanent)
    Soy soltero (temporary)
    Este olivo está recto (permanent)
    El océano Ártico está siempre frío (permanent)

    It's better to think
    SER represent qualites
    ESTAR represents conditions

    And both qualities and conditions can be permanent or temporary.

    Saludos

  19. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    Very useful the P.L.A.C.E. trick, but doesn't always work, look at this sentences:

    El espejo está roto (permanent)
    Soy soltero (temporary)
    Este olivo está recto (permanent)
    El océano Ártico está siempre frío (permanent)

    It's better to think
    SER represent qualites
    ESTAR represents conditions

    And both qualities and conditions can be permanent or temporary.

    Saludos

    well i don't know what roto, soltero, or recto means lol. at least i'm white, so i can get away with messing up estar/ser and por/para jaja

  20. #38
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    sorry I forgot the translation

    El espejo está roto (permanent) 'the is broken'
    Soy soltero (temporary) 'I'm single'
    Este olivo está recto (permanent) 'the olive tree is upright
    El océano Ártico está siempre frío (permanent) 'the Arctic Ocean is always cold'

    Greetings

  21. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    sorry I forgot the translation

    El espejo está roto (permanent) 'the is broken'
    Soy soltero (temporary) 'I'm single'
    Este olivo está recto (permanent) 'the olive tree is upright
    El océano Ártico está siempre frío (permanent) 'the Arctic Ocean is always cold'

    Greetings


    i knew the first one because it's a condition, the second one i would think 'toy, the third (i thought recto meant erect, i was right ) i would think es, the fourth, idk, it makes sense but idk what i would've said

  22. #40
    ~ Mex Moderator ~ Zahra2008's Avatar
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    hola a todos:

    si desean ayuda de una mexicana con el español?...bueno aqui estoy........

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