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  1. #41
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zahra2008 View Post
    hola a todos:

    si desean ayuda de una mexicana con el español?...bueno aqui estoy........
    Bienvenida al foro

  2. #42
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Y yo voy a tratar de traer el "castellano" de Argentina a los discursos q tengamos aca.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Y yo voy a tratar de traer el "castellano" de Argentina a los discursos q tengamos aca.
    i like the Argentinian accent. i've only heard it a few times, but it's pretty cool. i don't normally like castellano (it's the lisp that gets me), but i like argentina's

  4. #44
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    i like the Argentinian accent. i've only heard it a few times, but it's pretty cool. i don't normally like castellano (it's the lisp that gets me), but i like argentina's
    Yeah, technically we don't speak "castellano", but that's what we call. It's basically spanish, but we pronounce the "y" & the "ll" like the j in french & some of our verb conjugations are different, like "querés" instead of "quieres" & "hablás" instead of "hablas".

    & we use "vos" instead of "tú". But I've been finding out that other countries like Nicaragua & El Salvador also use the voceo...& Uruguay too, of course.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Yeah, technically we don't speak "castellano", but that's what we call. It's basically spanish, but we pronounce the "y" & the "ll" like the j in french & some of our verb conjugations are different, like "querés" instead of "quieres" & "hablás" instead of "hablas".

    & we use "vos" instead of "tú". But I've been finding out that other countries like Nicaragua & El Salvador also use the voceo...& Uruguay too, of course.
    yea, i knew all that. to me, it sounds kind of italian. i like it. the only accent i can think of that i like more is the dominican one because it sounds jamaican which is one of my favorite english accents

  6. #46
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    haha, yeah. A lot of our slang are actually italian words & of course we use "chau" for goodbye.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    haha, yeah. A lot of our slang are actually italian words & of course we use "chau" for goodbye.
    really? that's bad ***. once i learn spanish, i think i'm gonna start on italian. there's just too much slang though. every country has different stuff and different accents to get used to. it's worse than in the USA jaja

  8. #48
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Haha, yeah, that's true.

    I'm trying to learn all 5 romance languages. So far, romanian's the hardest.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Haha, yeah, that's true.

    I'm trying to learn all 5 romance languages. So far, romanian's the hardest.
    i only wanna learn what i like to call the "p***y gettin languages" that Spanish, Portuguese (for the Brazilians), and Italian jaja

  10. #50
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Haha, sounds like a plan, but you might wanna throw French in there too, they go crazy for it

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Haha, sounds like a plan, but you might wanna throw French in there too, they go crazy for it
    i hate french, france, and everything about the country. the only country i hate in this entire planet is france. too bad they made french fries, because they're so damn good jaja

  12. #52
    Senior Member Sochko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    too bad they made french fries, because they're so damn good jaja
    Haha, idk why, but this made me laugh. =D

    ----

    A similar thing happens to me, not with French, but with Italian. One can say that Spanish and Italian sound nearly the same (and it's a fact that they have various features in common, since they are both romance languages, of course), but I find Italian quite repulsive. I simply can't listen to the language. I cannot say this about castellano, because I love the sound of it. Argentinian accent too. Love these two "versions" of Spanish.
    What I like most about Spanish spoken in Argentina is the second person singular form of the verbs. (querés instead of quieres). And what I adore about castellano is the incredibly melodic touch the language has, and the ceceo.

    Since I've already been studying Spanish for ages, I was thinking of taking up another language. (I also love the Germanic languages, as well as Turkish, so I thought of German, Swedish or Turkish maybe), but I realised that, since I already know Spanish, it'd be much easier for me to start learning French, knowing that these two languages are similar to a great extent. To be honest, French would serve me far more than Swedish, let's say, since French is a worldly recognised language. Now I still don't know what to do. dmoney is changing my mind regarding French language... (just kidding ;D). I reckon I'll take German instead. =)
    'I have a cane and I know how to use it.'

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sochko View Post
    Haha, idk why, but this made me laugh. =D

    ----

    A similar thing happens to me, not with French, but with Italian. One can say that Spanish and Italian sound nearly the same (and it's a fact that they have various features in common, since they are both romance languages, of course), but I find Italian quite repulsive. I simply can't listen to the language. I cannot say this about castellano, because I love the sound of it. Argentinian accent too. Love these two "versions" of Spanish.
    What I like most about Spanish spoken in Argentina is the second person singular form of the verbs. (querés instead of quieres). And what I adore about castellano is the incredibly melodic touch the language has, and the ceceo.

    Since I've already been studying Spanish for ages, I was thinking of taking up another language. (I also love the Germanic languages, as well as Turkish, so I thought of German, Swedish or Turkish maybe), but I realised that, since I already know Spanish, it'd be much easier for me to start learning French, knowing that these two languages are similar to a great extent. To be honest, French would serve me far more than Swedish, let's say, since French is a worldly recognised language. Now I still don't know what to do. dmoney is changing my mind regarding French language... (just kidding ;D). I reckon I'll take German instead. =)
    what language you should learn really depends on your location-what's most useful for you? i live in the USA, so obviously Spanish is waaaay more useful than anything else. there's also a bunch of Laos people, but i'll never bother with an asian language (other than Japanese).

  14. #54
    Senior Member Sochko's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    what language you should learn really depends on your location-what's most useful for you? i live in the USA, so obviously Spanish is waaaay more useful than anything else. there's also a bunch of Laos people, but i'll never bother with an asian language (other than Japanese).
    Yup, definitely true. I was kidding a little bit in my previous post, but I surely agree that it's not wise enough for me to take classes in... Danish, for example, when I know I'd never have the chance to exchange a single word in Danish with somebody.
    The best option would be either a worldwide-spoken language (as Spanish or French, we can say) or a language from the ethnic minorities in the country (if such).
    'I have a cane and I know how to use it.'

  15. #55
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    I think German & French would be good because both are spoken quite widely. Plus German (so they say) is similar to English, so, I'm sure that's not too bad.

    As for Turkish, my friend's husband is from Turkey & I bought a book on it. It is SO hard; their sentences are literally flipped, like "The dog want I" instead of "I want the dog", so crazy.

  16. #56
    ~ Mex Moderator ~ Zahra2008's Avatar
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    Talking gracias

    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    Bienvenida al foro
    muchas gracias...

    im 100% mexican.. and i speak english... and im trying to learn arabic... and just a few words in turkish...

    Obviously, to learn english is the best thing for me, coz i live near of USA, i use to travel a lot there, but learn arabic is my dream, coz i want to travel to Egypt ONE DAY... and im getting ready to that DAY...

    and turkish... well.. i have a new friend from Ankara.. and i want to be polite, and learn some words for him

  17. #57
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    RULES FOR THE USE OF
    THE WRITTEN ACCENT IN SPANISH


    Words fall into three categories according to the way they are pronounced: agudas, llanas, esdrújulas.

    1. Words that are stressed on the last syllable are called agudas.
    If an aguda ends in a consonant other than n or s it is written without an accent mark. If an aguda ends in a vowel, or n or s it carries a written accent mark.

    e.g. reloj, amor, color, ciudad, calamar, flor, arroz
    e.g. avión, sofá, café, canción, ciempiés, estrés, zulú

    2. Words that are stressed on the next to the last syllable are called graves (or llanas in some countries). If a grave ends in a vowel or n or s it does not carry a written accent. If a grave ends in a consonant other than n or s it carries a written accent mark. The most of the spanish words are graves.
    e.g. pueblo, lengua, mesa, libros, España, goma, orden,
    e.g. lápiz, débil, césped, Cádiz

    3. Words that are stressed on the third to the last syllable are called esdrújulas. All esdrújula words carry a written accent.
    e.g. esdrújula, pájaro, artículo, magnífico, rápido, católico


    Diphthongs and Breaking a Diphthong

    A second use of the accent is to break a diphthong. Diphthongs are formed by combining a strong vowel (a, e, o) with a weak vowel (i, u) or two weak vowels in a single syllable.

    e.g viuda, ruido, aire , fauna, ambulancia, guante, peine, euro, viernes, fuego

    If a strong and weak vowel appear together but do not form a syllable, the weak vowel carries a written accent to break the diphthong. In other words when –i or –u are pronunced stressed must be accented

    e.g. maíz, día, había, Raúl, río, tío

    Accents to show meaning

    Some words which are spelt the same have an accent to show their meaning or different grammatical function

    e.g.

    mi (adjective my) -- mí (pronoun me)
    tu (adjective your) -- tú (pronoun you)
    el (adjective the) -- él (pronoun he)
    si (if) -- sí (yes)
    solo (alone) -- sólo (only)
    te (you as an object) -- té (tea)

    Accents also are used in Spanish to distinguish demonstrative pronouns, which are usually accented, from demonstrative adjectives, which are not.

    "Me gusta este libro", I like this book. "Me gusta éste", "I like this" or "I like this one."

  18. #58
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    can somebody help me understand the difference between cada dia and todo los dias (that sounds weird spelled properly since usually i'd just say to lo dia :P). i know cada dia is each day and todo los dias is every day, but when i think about it in english, they pretty much mean the same thing

  19. #59
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    can somebody help me understand the difference between cada dia and todo los dias (that sounds weird spelled properly since usually i'd just say to lo dia :P). i know cada dia is each day and todo los dias is every day, but when i think about it in english, they pretty much mean the same thing
    I would answer your question with another question: are "Each day" and "Every day" interchangeable? Because it's the same thing in spanish

    to me "cada día" and "todos los días" are the same, have no different meaning

    "Cada día" treats the days one by one; "todos los días" collectively. In informal contexts, they probably can be used interchangeably

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    I would answer your question with another question: are "Each day" and "Every day" interchangeable? Because it's the same thing in spanish

    to me "cada día" and "todos los días" are the same, have no different meaning

    "Cada día" treats the days one by one; "todos los días" collectively. In informal contexts, they probably can be used interchangeably
    in english i couldn't really tell you a difference, that's why i wanted to know

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