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  1. #61
    Junior Member countthestars_x's Avatar
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    Default Uses of Ser.

    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    let's star with the verb SER TO BE

    Although it is an extremely common verb, ser can be confusing for many Spanish students because it is usually translated as "to be," same as the verb estar. Although they can often be translated the same way, ser and estar are distinct verbs with distinct meanings and are seldom synonymous.

    It is probably most helpful to learn the two verbs separately

    Here are the main uses of ser:

    - To indicate existence: Ser o no ser (to be or not to be)
    - With adjectives to indicate inherent, innate or essential characteristics
    La casa es grande. (The house is big.)
    Soy feliz. (I am happy)
    - To indicate origin, nature or identity: Soy de Argentina. (I am from Argentina.)
    - To indicate possession or ownership : El coche es mío ((The car is mine.)
    - To tell the time: Es la una. (It is 1:00.) Son las dos. (It is 2:00.)
    - To indicate where an event takes place: El concierto es en la playa. (The concert is on the beach.) La fiesta será en mi casa. (The party will be at my house.)

    - In impersonal statements: Es importante. (It is important.) Fue difícil. (It was difficult.)

    Present
    yo soy ...................................(I am)
    tú eres ..................................(you are)
    él, ella, usted es.................... (he is, she is, you are
    nosotros, nosotras somos.... (we are)
    vosotros, vosotras sois......... (you are)
    ellos, ellas, ustedes son........ (they are, you are) were)

    As you see is an irregular verb

    Notice how in Spanish the verb ending identifies the subject, except when using a third person, in which case we have several possibilities. In those cases you will find that either the subject is identified through the use of the personal pronoun or name, or it has been identified in a previous sentence

    To make the negative form of the verb you must add no before the verb

    Yo no soy (I am not)
    no eres (you are not)
    etc.

    You said "To indicate where an event takes place." Wouldn't the verb estar be used instead? I mean, I'll admit, I'm only learning Spanish, but I know a decent amount to have a conversation. 'Estar' is used with location whereas 'ser' isn't.

    Am I correct? Or am I just thinking too hard? -__-;;



    P.S. Anyone want to help reinforce my Saber vs Conocer rules? I remember very few rules of how to tell when which is used. -__-;; ¡Gracías!

  2. #62
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    i need two things. how do you say "will"? like "i will" "you will" etf

    and what is the difference between "éste and esto"? in school i learned that este (without an accent) is an adjective and esto is a noun, but nothing about éste

  3. #63
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmoney101 View Post
    i need two things. how do you say "will"? like "i will" "you will" etf

    and what is the difference between "éste and esto"? in school i learned that este (without an accent) is an adjective and esto is a noun, but nothing about éste
    With the "will" thing, it depends.

    There are two ways to say this:

    "I will" or "I am going to"

    For "I am going to" you use "ir + a + infinitive"
    yo voy a comer - I am going to eat

    yo voy
    tú vas
    el/ella va
    nosotros vamos
    ustedes van
    ellos/ellas van

    But the real "will" thing is a tense in itself and changes with each verb

    The other way of saying "I'm going to to eat" is "I will eat", s:

    Yo voy a comer = Yo comeré

    So, for AR verbs (using hablar):
    yo hablaré - I will talk
    tú hablarás - you will talk
    el/ella hablará - He/she will talk
    nosotros hablaramos - We will talk
    ustedes hablarán - You (pl.) will talk
    ellos/ellas hablarán - They will talk

    For ER & IR verbs (using comer)
    yo comeré - I will eat
    tú comerás
    el/ella comerá
    nosotros comeremos
    ustedes comerán
    ellos/ellas comerán

    There are some differences for irregular verbs

    Hopefully this wasn't too confusing...let me know if you need any clarifications.




    & for the éste and esto thing...

    First of all, most people no longer put the accent on "éste" and just say "este".

    The difference is that "este" means "this one"

    ex: You quiero este juguete - I want this toy

    "esto" means "this"

    es: No quiero hacer esto - I don't want to do this


    Again, let me know if you need me to clarify, hope it helped!

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  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    With the "will" thing, it depends.

    There are two ways to say this:

    "I will" or "I am going to"

    For "I am going to" you use "ir + a + infinitive"
    yo voy a comer - I am going to eat

    yo voy
    tú vas
    el/ella va
    nosotros vamos
    ustedes van
    ellos/ellas van

    But the real "will" thing is a tense in itself and changes with each verb

    The other way of saying "I'm going to to eat" is "I will eat", s:

    Yo voy a comer = Yo comeré

    So, for AR verbs (using hablar):
    yo hablaré - I will talk
    tú hablarás - you will talk
    el/ella hablará - He/she will talk
    nosotros hablaramos - We will talk
    ustedes hablarán - You (pl.) will talk
    ellos/ellas hablarán - They will talk

    For ER & IR verbs (using comer)
    yo comeré - I will eat
    tú comerás
    el/ella comerá
    nosotros comeremos
    ustedes comerán
    ellos/ellas comerán

    There are some differences for irregular verbs

    Hopefully this wasn't too confusing...let me know if you need any clarifications.




    & for the éste and esto thing...

    First of all, most people no longer put the accent on "éste" and just say "este".

    The difference is that "este" means "this one"

    ex: You quiero este juguete - I want this toy

    "esto" means "this"

    es: No quiero hacer esto - I don't want to do this


    Again, let me know if you need me to clarify, hope it helped!

    ok, that makes sense. and i meant i will as in i'm willing to do something. ejemplo "i'll take this one (if you want that one)". i already know voy a (jaja, that sounds weird to me sense i usually just use the contraction voa )

  6. #65
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Umm, well "I'll take this one" or 'I'll do it" would be "Lo haré"

    I'm not sure I get what you mean though...

  7. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Umm, well "I'll take this one" or 'I'll do it" would be "Lo haré"

    I'm not sure I get what you mean though...
    that's pretty much it. i will help you, i will do this for you, stuff like that. not what you're going to do, but what you'll do willingly jaja

  8. #67
    Senior Member Música101's Avatar
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    Será- It will be

    yo seré I will be
    tú serás- You will be
    él será- He/She will be
    nosotros- seremos- We will be
    vosotros seréis- You(pl.) will be
    ellos serán-They will be


    Saber- To Know
    yo sabré- I will know
    tú sabrás - You will know
    él sabrá- He/ She will know
    nosotros sabremos - We will know
    Vosotros sabréis - You(pl.) will know
    ellos sabrán - They will know


    Poner- To Put
    yo pondré- I will put
    tú pondrás
    él pondrá
    nosotros pondremos
    Vosotros pondréis
    ellos pondrán


    Venir - To come
    yo vendré- I will come
    tú vendrás
    él vendrá
    nosotros vendremos
    Vosotros vendréis
    ellos vendrán

  9. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Música101 View Post
    Será- It will be

    yo seré I will be
    tú serás- You will be
    él será- He/She will be
    nosotros- seremos- We will be
    vosotros seréis- You(pl.) will be
    ellos serán-They will be


    Saber- To Know
    yo sabré- I will know
    tú sabrás - You will know
    él sabrá- He/ She will know
    nosotros sabremos - We will know
    Vosotros sabréis - You(pl.) will know
    ellos sabrán - They will know


    Poner- To Put
    yo pondré- I will put
    tú pondrás
    él pondrá
    nosotros pondremos
    Vosotros pondréis
    ellos pondrán


    Venir - To come
    yo vendré- I will come
    tú vendrás
    él vendrá
    nosotros vendremos
    Vosotros vendréis
    ellos vendrán
    ok, i think that's what i needed to know. i've seen seré in a lot of songs, so now i've got a better understanding. thanks

  10. #69
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by countthestars_x View Post
    You said "To indicate where an event takes place." Wouldn't the verb estar be used instead? I mean, I'll admit, I'm only learning Spanish, but I know a decent amount to have a conversation. 'Estar' is used with location whereas 'ser' isn't.

    Am I correct? Or am I just thinking too hard? -__-;;



    P.S. Anyone want to help reinforce my Saber vs Conocer rules? I remember very few rules of how to tell when which is used. -__-;; ¡Gracías!
    To say that something is happening in a place you must use SER

    El concierto es en la playa or el concierto tiene lugar en la playa
    La reunión será en mi despacho or la reunión tendrá lugar en mi despacho. TENER LUGAR is more formal.


    CONOCER

    It means that we have had some experience of the thing (or person) known.
    'conozco un libro, una persona, una película'. The use of the preposition a is mandatory when the direct object is a person:

    Vamos a tomar algo. Yo conozco un sitio por aquí buenísimo (Let's have something. I know a very good place around here)

    ¿Conoces a Fernando? Es un chico muy simpático.
    Do you know Fernando? It's a very nice guy.

    SABER

    1 .- We use it to speak about skills such as swimming, drawing, speaking a language ...
    ¿sabes chino? Do you speak Chinese?

    2 .- It is also used to talk about the knowledge we have or not about an information.

    ¿Sabes que María se ha casado?
    You know that María had been married?

    ¿Sabes quién viene esta tarde?
    Do you know who is coming this afternoon?


    SABER VS CONOCER


    Sometimes SABER and CONOCER are used in the same cases, are synonymous:

    1 .- When CONOCER means to know or be aware of an event or a happening.

    Conozco () las dificultades del trabajo (I know the difficulties of this work)
    Hoy las noticias se conocen (se saben) al mismo tiempo en cualquier parte del mundo
    Today the news are known at the same time anywhere in the world

    2 .- When we want to express the fact that we have knowledge about subjet or ideas on science:
    Ramón conoce/sabe su trabajo (Ramon knows his job)
    ¿Conoces (sabes) la teoría de la relatividad (Do you know the theory of relativity?)

  11. #70
    Senior Member Música101's Avatar
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    Tener que

    Tener Que- To have to

    1. Tengo que comer las verduras.
    I have to eat the vegetables.

    2. Mia tiene que leer un libro
    Mia has to read a book

    Tener ganas de- To feel like

    1.Tengo ganas de ir a la playa
    I feel like going to the beach

    2. No tengo ganas de estudiar
    I don't feel like studying

  12. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    To say that something is happening in a place you must use SER

    El concierto es en la playa or el concierto tiene lugar en la playa
    La reunión será en mi despacho or la reunión tendrá lugar en mi despacho. TENER LUGAR is more formal.


    CONOCER

    It means that we have had some experience of the thing (or person) known.
    'conozco un libro, una persona, una película'. The use of the preposition a is mandatory when the direct object is a person:

    Vamos a tomar algo. Yo conozco un sitio por aquí buenísimo (Let's have something. I know a very good place around here)

    ¿Conoces a Fernando? Es un chico muy simpático.
    Do you know Fernando? It's a very nice guy.

    SABER

    1 .- We use it to speak about skills such as swimming, drawing, speaking a language ...
    ¿sabes chino? Do you speak Chinese?

    2 .- It is also used to talk about the knowledge we have or not about an information.

    ¿Sabes que María se ha casado?
    You know that María had been married?

    ¿Sabes quién viene esta tarde?
    Do you know who is coming this afternoon?


    SABER VS CONOCER


    Sometimes SABER and CONOCER are used in the same cases, are synonymous:

    1 .- When CONOCER means to know or be aware of an event or a happening.

    Conozco () las dificultades del trabajo (I know the difficulties of this work)
    Hoy las noticias se conocen (se saben) al mismo tiempo en cualquier parte del mundo
    Today the news are known at the same time anywhere in the world

    2 .- When we want to express the fact that we have knowledge about subjet or ideas on science:
    Ramón conoce/sabe su trabajo (Ramon knows his job)
    ¿Conoces (sabes) la teoría de la relatividad (Do you know the theory of relativity?)

    thanks for posting that. i forgot about the word conocer . i pretty much memorized it as "conocer is to know somebody/something" "saber is everything else" jaja

  13. #72
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    This is great! I am at the moment learning Spanish, can someone tell me the Spanish they speak in Argentina? I want to learn that Spanish. I speak English, French and Greek now, but want to learn Spanish as well, I have been learning for about a month now and have the basics and the verbs more or less figured out. I also like Italian as well and understand a bit.So is the Argentinian the Castilano ? Is that considered the Latin American Spanish?

  14. #73
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katrocks View Post
    This is great! I am at the moment learning Spanish, can someone tell me the Spanish they speak in Argentina? I want to learn that Spanish. I speak English, French and Greek now, but want to learn Spanish as well, I have been learning for about a month now and have the basics and the verbs more or less figured out. I also like Italian as well and understand a bit.So is the Argentinian the Castilano ? Is that considered the Latin American Spanish?

    Haha, welcome, that's awesome!

    Technically we speak spanish in Argentina, but in Argentina we call it "castellano" because we have a different accent, pronounce certain words differently, etc, but it is considered spanish.

    & castellano is technically what is spoken in all of latin america, but everyone else calls it espanol.

    it explains it A LOT better here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castellano

  15. #74
    Senior Member xiurell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Haha, welcome, that's awesome!

    Technically we speak spanish in Argentina, but in Argentina we call it "castellano" because we have a different accent, pronounce certain words differently, etc, but it is considered spanish.

    & castellano is technically what is spoken in all of latin america, but everyone else calls it espanol.

    it explains it A LOT better here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castellano
    Here in Spain we call it too 'castellano' to distinguish it from the others spanish languages as catalan, galician and euskera so the Spanish Constitution uses the term castellano to define the official language of the whole Spanish State.

  16. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by xiurell View Post
    Here in Spain we call it too 'castellano' to distinguish it from the others spanish languages as catalan, galician and euskera so the Spanish Constitution uses the term castellano to define the official language of the whole Spanish State.
    Spain is the most different hispanic country on the planet jaja. i don't see why you couldn't just call it spanish. you've gotta be like here in the USA and do everything differently and tell all the other countries f' you (or better yet, chinga tu madre) jaja. Good stuff, good stuff

  17. #76
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    I kind of like the Spaniard accent, except for how they pronounce their "s"s...maybe that's because in Argentina we hardly pronounce our "s"s, lol.

  18. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    I kind of like the Spaniard accent, except for how they pronounce their "s"s...maybe that's because in Argentina we hardly pronounce our "s"s, lol.
    yea, that's what i always didn't like. your accents are kind of how i talk (a mix between puerto rican and dominican that i learned from music). i only pronounce my s if i talk with a mexican because it seems they can never figure it out jaja

  19. #78
    Senior Member DeBaires's Avatar
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    Haha, yeah, I always have to slow it down when I talk to anyone

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Haha, yeah, I always have to slow it down when I talk to anyone
    yea, i always love to talk to Puerto Ricans or Dominicans (or anyone that knows the accents) since i can talk how i'm comfortable with

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeBaires View Post
    Haha, welcome, that's awesome!

    Technically we speak spanish in Argentina, but in Argentina we call it "castellano" because we have a different accent, pronounce certain words differently, etc, but it is considered spanish.

    & castellano is technically what is spoken in all of latin america, but everyone else calls it espanol.

    it explains it A LOT better here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castellano
    Thankx for the wonderful reply!!

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