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  1. #161
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    can someone translate this for me ... thanks in advance

    κανε edit και γραψτα στα ελληνικα

    WARN και στις δυο σας για παράβαση κανονισμών

    τα λινκς διαγράφονται

  2. #162
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    κανε edit και γραψτα στα ελληνικα=edit your post and write them in Greek

    WARN και στις δυο σας για παράβαση κανονισμών=both of you receive a warning for violation of the rules

    τα λινκς διαγράφονται=the links are deleted
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  3. #163
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    wow, because of what ?
    and a link I've post has been deleted also

    anyway thanks for the translation

  4. #164
    Senior Member Fidelitas's Avatar
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    Default Question

    What is 'me, myself & I in Greek'? (also latin characters please)

    thanks

  5. #165
    Senior Member Zvezda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelitas View Post
    What is 'me, myself & I in Greek'? (also latin characters please)

    thanks

    That doesn't translate well in Greek, it's something like "Ego, emena ki o eaftos mou". I do not think it's an exression a native Greek speaker would ever use because it sounds strange. Somebody else my be able to come up with a better translation though.
    Bio je Novembar 2009 godine, zamišljao sam kako hodaš ulicom Bana Jelačića cipelama od zmijske kože..

  6. #166
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    How to say "I love you so much. I'll love you and be with you to the end of all ends, and though the birth of all births." to a girl in Latin and Greek letters?

  7. #167
    Moderator Milena's Avatar
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    Could someone tell me what "filotimo" means? When do you use it?

  8. #168
    @#MOmderator#@ maria_gr's Avatar
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    Aham, filotimo... Filotimo is the great sensibility, the scrupulousness. We use it when a person has morality and dignity.
    Άνθρωποι τύχης είδωλον επλάσαντο, πρόφασιν ιδίης αβουλίης.

    ~Δημόκριτος~

  9. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milena View Post
    Could someone tell me what "filotimo" means?I heard that it's a perfect Greek word...When do you use that word?

    Filotimo (φιλότιμο) -
    Examples.
    1) When a doctor has a fee of X $, € or whatever (X = expensive) and a, not that wealthy, man goes to him, then the doctor who has "φιλότιμο" sometimes, decides to be paid less money by that man. Because he feels that it is not fair for the poor man and that he also has a right to proper medicare.

    2) When turists visit a foreign and they get a taxi from the airport to the hotel, if the taxi-driver is cunning and charges them extra money (i.e. instead of 10€, he charges 50 or 100€), then we greeks say that this taxi-driver has no "φιλότιμο", because he takes advantage of the situation that the turist doesn't know the language, neither the distances etc., so he cheats him.

    3) Let's suppose that we have a married couple. And that the man does all the favours of the woman. If she keeps asking more and more expensive things, while she doesn't recognise any effort of the man, if she spends money as if she were a queen, while at the same moment the man is working hard as a slave, then we say that the woman has no "φιλότιμο".

    Sorry I can't explain in a better way. Maybe someone else may come up with a better description. However, I hope that you got the feeling of the word "filotimo".

    Φιλότιμο, is a very important (human) value for us. It shows the integrity of a person, his/her beliefs, the way he/she was raised and educated, and many other important things.

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    sushiko (01-04-2010)

  11. #170
    Moderator Milena's Avatar
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    I see...Thanks very much for the explanations Maria and boubou.

  12. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milena View Post
    I see...Thanks very much for the explanations Maria and boubou.
    Milena you are welcome

  13. #172
    Senior Member Fidelitas's Avatar
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    Default Question

    Is this correct?

    The Greek name for Christmas is Christougena.

    Merry Christmas = Kala Christougena?
    Chronia Polla = "Happy New Year"
    Eftikismenos o kenourisos kronos = Happy New Year (formal)

  14. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelitas View Post
    Is this correct?

    The Greek name for Christmas is Christougena.

    Merry Christmas = Kala Christougena?
    Chronia Polla = "Happy New Year"
    Eftikismenos o kenourisos kronos = Happy New Year (formal)
    In general you are right.
    Just allow me a tiny comment:
    Chronia Polla (Χρόνια Πολλά) is a general wish of ours, that applies to all special events like celebrations, New Year's eve, Christma's eve, Easter, name days, birthdays, anniversaries etc.
    Χρόνια Πολλά, literally means, "Live many years"

  15. #174
    Senior Member Fidelitas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boubou View Post
    In general you are right.
    Just allow me a tiny comment:
    Chronia Polla (Χρόνια Πολλά) is a general wish of ours, that applies to all special events like celebrations, New Year's eve, Christma's eve, Easter, name days, birthdays, anniversaries etc.
    Χρόνια Πολλά, literally means, "Live many years"
    Thanks you for the explanation! I really love Greece!

    So if I want to wish some a merry christmas and happy new year this is correct? Kala Christougena - Eftikismenos o kenourisos kronos. I don't want to make mistakes

  16. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelitas View Post
    Thanks you for the explanation! I really love Greece!

    So if I want to wish some a merry christmas and happy new year this is correct? Kala Christougena - Eftikismenos o kenourisos kronos. I don't want to make mistakes

    That's right!
    "Kala Hristuyena & Eftihismenos o kenuryos hronos" is absolutely fine.
    Means Merry Christmas and a Happy new Year..

  17. #176
    Senior Member Fidelitas's Avatar
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    Arrow Hey

    What is the meaning of Geia sas? I think it means 'hallo'... Am I right?

  18. #177
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    Yes, you're right You use it when you address more than one person (sas--plural) OR when you address someone you don't know very well, someone older, someone in authority, etc.

    When you address one person, someone you are in friendly terms with, you use Geia sou (sou- singular)

    Usually these greetings are addressed when you meet someone, but they can also be used as Good bye.

    The simple form, without the pronoun, is also widely used: Geia!

  19. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelitas View Post
    What is the meaning of Geia sas? I think it means 'hallo'... Am I right?
    Geia sas - Γεια σας
    we say "Γεια σας" when we want to greet someone in an informal way. It's equivalent to Hello and it refers either to a single person to whom we would like to show politeness, or to many persons (>1).
    Γεια σας > Στην υγεία σας (this is the sentence where it derives from, and which actually is a wish; it wishes us to be healthy)

  20. #179
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    lol! Now you have two answers

    Boubou's explanation is more complex, so now this greeting shouldn't have any more secrets to you

  21. #180
    Senior Member Fidelitas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dya View Post
    lol! Now you have two answers

    Boubou's explanation is more complex, so now this greeting shouldn't have any more secrets to you
    Thanks for the help!!! Have a great day!

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