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Thread: Danish Language

  1. #21
    PlainChaos
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    Okay then

    Hvor meget koster det? (How much does it cost?)
    Verb used here is cost: koster (present tense) - kostede (past tense) - kostet (past participial)

    pronounciation: [wo marget kos-tah dhe?]

    Hvordan kommer jeg til [name of place/adress]? (How do I get to [...]?)

    [wodan kommah yay til ...?]

    Alternative: Hvor ligger [...]? (Where is [...]?)
    Hvordan finder jeg [...]? (How do I find [...]?)

    Verb come: kommer (present) - kom (past) - kommet (past participial)
    Verb lie: ligger - lå - ligget
    Verb find: finder - fandt - fundet
    Last edited by PlainChaos; 08-10-2009 at 04:19 PM.

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  3. #22
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    thanks will learn that

    one more thing, can you write the whole conjugation of some other verbs. Like do, eat, go and so on
    Tose Proeski - The Hardest Thing --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKRrADJ7j3E
    * Agapi mou gurna pisw, Mou Leipeis... :[

  4. #23
    PlainChaos
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    Yeah of course, you just come with examples/ideas, cause I'm totally blank atm!

    When you say 'whole conjugation' you do mean the way I wrote it in my previous post, like with the present/past tense and so on, right?

    (to) do = (at) gøre
    Imperative/The stem of this word is: gør
    gør - gjorde - gjort

    Examples:
    1) Det han gør, er forkert. (What he's doing is wrong.)
    2) Gjorde det ondt? (Did it hurt?)
    3) Hvad har du gjort? (What have you done?)

    (to) make/do = (at) lave
    The stem of this word is: lav
    laver - lavede - lavet

    Examples:
    1) Hvad laver du? (What are you doing?) This is like saying what's up? In Danish we use this slang instead: hva'så?
    2) Hun lavede en tegning i går. (She made a drawing yesterday.)
    3) Han har lavet sine lektier. (He has done his homework.)

    (to) eat = (at) spise
    spiser - spiste - spist
    The stem of this word is: spis

    Examples:
    1) Nu spiser vi dessert. (Now we're eating dessert.)
    2) Hun spiste langsomt. (She ate slowly.)
    3) Hvad har I spist i dag? (What have you eaten today?)
    4) Spis dit mad! (Eat up your food!)

    (to) go = (at) gå
    The stem of this word is:
    går - gik - gået

    Examples:
    1) Han besluttede sig for at gå en tur. (He decided to go for a walk.)
    2) De gik hjem. (They went home.)
    3) Hun er gået. (She has left).

    (Also, in my previous post the verbs in present tense should end with -r, I accidentally wrote the infinitive form, my bad! )

    NB: In the past participial form you'll always have either one of these verbs: være (to be), blive (stay, become) or have (to have) in front of the other verb, let's take some of the previous examples:

    Hun er gået.
    er is the present form of være.

    But when the main verb is være, you're gonna use have/har in front of it and when it's blive you use være/er in front of it (remember, we're still talking past participial):

    Hun har været syg. (She has been sick.)

    Hun er blevet syg. (She has got sick).

    And so on, I hope I have explained it well, otherwise you can just ask!

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  6. #24
    PlainChaos
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    There are the regular verbs and the irregular verbs.
    The irregular verbs don't follow any definite pattern, but we have a rule with the regular verbs:

    Present tense: stem of the verb + er
    Past tense: stem of the verb + ede
    Past participial: stem of the verb + et

    At elske (to love) is a perfect example on a regular verb:

    Imperative/stem: elsk

    elsker - elskede - (har) elsket

    Irregular verbs:

    At være (to be)
    Imperative/stem: vær
    er - var - (the past participial form is har været)

    At have (to have)
    Imperative/stem: hav
    har - havde - (the past participial form is har haft)

    At blive (to become)
    Imperative/stem: bliv
    bliver - blev - (the past participial form is er blevet)

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  8. #25
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    ah thank you very much Now I will have to read all these things carefully
    btw this At that's standing in front of the verbs you wrote, means the same to in Enligsh, right?
    Also does it have the same meaning as to express direction?

    And one more thing... is this right for the verb to do on Present Simple Tense
    Jeg gore
    Du gore
    Han,Hun, Den gore

    Vi gore
    I gore
    de gore
    Last edited by velvet_sky; 08-06-2009 at 04:26 AM.
    Tose Proeski - The Hardest Thing --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKRrADJ7j3E
    * Agapi mou gurna pisw, Mou Leipeis... :[

  9. #26
    PlainChaos
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    You're very welcome!

    And please feel free to ask questions when there's something you don't quite understand.
    The more you ask, the more you learn, or as we say in Danish:

    Der findes ingen dumme spørgsmål, kun dumme svar!
    There are no stupid questions, only stupid answers!


    Imagine if you guys really did learn Danish only by means of this page lol.
    That would be so cool, I won't promise it's gonna happen, but I'mma do my best!

    At means to, but it's not a preposition, so to answer your question, no it doesn't express direction, the word til is a preposition and it's the one that's used to express direction.

    Examples on prepositions (called forholdsord in Danish):
    På (on), om (about/of), ved (at), foran (ahead/in front), bagved (behind), under (under), med (with), i (in), til (to), over (over), imellem (between), for (for).

    No dear, in the previous post, the conjugation of gøre was shown, and if you look at it carefully,
    you'll see that it's gør in present tense:

    (to) do = (at) gøre
    Imperative/The stem of this word is: gør
    gør - gjorde - gjort

    But when you have a modal verb standing in front of the verb, then you add -e to the verb,
    just like you did right before!

    Ex. Jeg kan gøre.

    Modal verbs:

    kan (present) - kunne (past) - kunnet (past principial*) = can - could
    skal - skulle - skullet = shall - should
    - måtte - måttet = may, might
    bør - burde - burdet = should, ought to
    vil - ville - villet = will - would

    *The past principal form doesn't exist in English when you're dealing with the modal verbs, but it does exist in the Danish modal verbs, even though it's rarely used.

    Ex. Han har kunnet spille klaver, da han var syv. (He could play the piano when he was seven).

    You can't say he has could in English. First of all, that would just sound totally silly And second, you don't have the past principial form for the modal verbs in English at all, unlike Danish, where you can say han har kunnet.
    Last edited by PlainChaos; 08-06-2009 at 10:39 AM.

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  11. #27
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    Hello Guys .
    Im danish Too ,but PlainChaos Did an excellent job here, so i think i will let her about the grammar
    but if you have specific phrases or sentences or lyrics or words or anything like that, i will be here . (:
    Niye yaptığına dair tek bir neden söyleyebilir misin bana?

  12. #28
    PlainChaos
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sisii View Post
    Hello Guys .
    Im danish Too ,but PlainChaos Did an excellent job here, so i think i will let her about the grammar
    but if you have specific phrases or sentences or lyrics or words or anything like that, i will be here . (:
    Thank you canım
    Du er meget velkommen til at give en hånd, er snart ved at løbe tør for gode ideer!

  13. #29
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    Ok I have some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by PlainChaos View Post
    Dative

    Singularis
    1st person: Mig (Me)
    2nd person: Dig (or "De", polite form) (You)
    3rd person: Han, hende, den (det) (He, her, it)

    Pluralis
    1st person: Mig (Me)
    2nd person: Dig (or "De", polite form) (You)
    3rd person: Han, hende, den (det) (He, her, it)
    here in the 3rd person you wrote that Han is He did you mean his sorry If I sound a bit stupid but as a beginner everything is very cloudy to me

    Also what is the difference between hvor and hvordan? They both means how right? like I see in
    Quote Originally Posted by PlainChaos View Post
    Hvor meget koster det? (How much does it cost?)
    Verb used here is cost: koste (present tense) - kostede (past tense) - kostet (past participial)

    pronounciation: [wo marget kos-tah dhe?]

    Hvordan kommer jeg til [name of place/adress]? (How do I get to [...]?)

    [wodan kommah yay til ...?]
    also can you write down how is in Danish where, why, when, how, this, that, over there, now, then, yesterday, today, tomorrow, slow, fast and so on...

    and also: 2) Gjorde det ondt? (Did it hurt?)
    here you used "det" for "it"... but your previous post you wrote that "it" is also "den" .. when should I use den and when det


    and how is "yes" and "no"



    Tose Proeski - The Hardest Thing --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKRrADJ7j3E
    * Agapi mou gurna pisw, Mou Leipeis... :[

  14. #30
    PlainChaos
    Guest

    here in the 3rd person you wrote that Han is He did you mean his sorry If I sound a bit stupid but as a beginner everything is very cloudy to me
    Hehe that's okay, I totally understand!
    No, it's not his, but he (and btw, it was supposed to be ham and not han, typing mistake sorry).
    Here's an example to show you how it works:

    Lene købte ham en kage.
    Lene bought him a cake.


    In Danish we call:

    Nominative (subject) = Grundled (x cross)
    Akkusative (direct object) = Genstandsled ( triangle)
    Dative (indirect object) = Hensynsled ( square)

    In Danish syntax the verb is called udsagnsled and it's marked with a circle o.

    So let's analyze the above sentence:

    Lene (subject x) købte (verb o) ham (indirect object ) en kage (direct object ).

    To find out what's what in this sentence we simply ask:

    - Who? (subject x) Lene
    - Did what? (verb o) købte (bought)
    - Bought what? (direct object ) en kage (a cake)
    - To whom? (indirect object ) ham (to him, notice: in Danish you don't have to say til ham, it's sufficient just to use the dative form, ham in this case.

    Here's a little task for you, so how would you say: Lene bought me a cake?

    Also what is the difference between hvor and hvordan? They both means how right? like I see in
    Normally hvor means where, and hvordan means how, but when we're talking about amounts of something, then we use hvor, you don't say hvordan meget when asking how much, but hvor meget.

    and also: 2) Gjorde det ondt? (Did it hurt?)
    here you used "det" for "it"... but your previous post you wrote that "it" is also "den" .. when should I use den and when det
    Damn, I knew you would ask that sooner or later
    That's probably one of the most difficult things in Danish grammar, when do we use det and den or et and en?

    Well, I don't think there's any rule actually, but when you're e.g. talking about the weather (it's raining) then we normally use det (det regner) and also when describing something (that sounds great! det lyder godt!) otherwise it's kinda hard to tell when you're exactly gonna use which form, usually when we're dealing with higher living beings (like humans) we use den:

    Ex. 1) En pige (a girl), den pige (that girl), pigen (the girl).
    Ex. 2) Et dyr (an animal), det dyr (that animal), dyret (the animal).
    Ex. 3) Et hus (a house), det hus (that house), huset (the house).

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  16. #31
    PlainChaos
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    also can you write down how is in Danish where, why, when, how, this, that, over there, now, then, yesterday, today, tomorrow, slow, fast and so on...
    Where = Hvor
    Why = Hvorfor
    When = Hvornår
    How = Hvordan
    What = Hvad
    Who = Hverm
    Which = Hvilke (pl.), hvilket* (sing.), hvilken* (sing.)

    *Just like with det and den, this depends on the gender of the word that comes right after.

    Hvilket hus bor du i?
    Which house do you live in?

    Hvilken pige er din søster?
    Which girl is your sister?


    In Danish we have two genders: fælleskøn (common gender) and intetkøn (neutrum).
    With words of the common gender we use the indefinite article en, while with the neutrum we use et.

    This = Dette/denne (see the above explanation).
    That = Det/den, sometimes you can choose to add der, like this: den der.
    Over there = Derover
    Now = Nu
    Then (back then, in those days) = Dengang
    Yesterday = I går
    Today = I dag
    Tomorrow = I morgen
    Slow = Langsom
    Fast = Hurtig
    Yes = Ja
    No = Nej
    And so on = Og så videre
    Last edited by PlainChaos; 08-10-2009 at 04:26 PM.

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  18. #32
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    det er altså også svært at lærer andre sprog synes jeg, godt jeg ikke skal være lærer (: men hvis jeg kommer på noget skal jeg nok skrive her, eller hvis der er noget jeg kan svarer på såå skal jeg nok os hjælpe (: Sorry Guys but its a lot easier to talk in danish when we both a from denmark, we just talked about how we should learn you guys this difficult language .. (:
    Niye yaptığına dair tek bir neden söyleyebilir misin bana?

  19. #33
    PlainChaos
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    That sounds great, and yeah, I'm glad I won't be a teacher either, though it's kinda fun!
    Actually, I've always been good with languages, and I really like tutoring people, but it takes a lot of patience, and tbh I don't think I'd be able to handle a whole class of students lol.

  20. #34
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    If someone maybe have a flirt in denmark or gonna have i will help you a little with this
    whats your name - hvad hedder du
    how old are you - hvor gammel er du
    where do you come from - hvor kommer du fra
    where do you live - hvor bor du
    do you have any sisters - Har du nogen søskende
    how old are he/she/they - hvor gammel/gammel/gamle han/hun/de
    I love you - Jeg elsker dig
    I love you too - Jeg elsker også dig
    I miss you - Jeg savner dig
    Im gonna miss you - jeg vil savne dig
    My Life - mit liv
    you look very nice - du ser rigtig godt ud
    Niye yaptığına dair tek bir neden söyleyebilir misin bana?

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  22. #35
    PlainChaos
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    lol god idé

  23. #36
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlainChaos View Post
    Here's a little task for you, so how would you say: Lene bought me a cake?
    well, let's see if I am right should it be: Lene købte Mig en kage.

    about hvor... so it's hvor meger for how much, but this is used only when we ask about amount, in the others cases we use just hvor for where, and hvordan for how? like when you say how are you, we will use hvordan, right?

    den and det:
    soo I use det only for humans, otherwise with subjects and actions I use den, did I get it right?


    for now I think I don't have any questions, but tomorrow when I read your posts again I may ask something more, hehe

    ahmm also, if it's not a problem can you please edit the posts where you made a typing mistake, 'cause when I read again the post I may forget that you said that it's otherwise really really thanks for all your help, I really do appreciate it!
    Tose Proeski - The Hardest Thing --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKRrADJ7j3E
    * Agapi mou gurna pisw, Mou Leipeis... :[

  24. #37
    PlainChaos
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    well, let's see if I am right should it be: Lene købte Mig en kage.
    Thumbs up, that's correct!

    about hvor... so it's hvor meger for how much, but this is used only when we ask about amount, in the others cases we use just hvor for where, and hvordan for how? like when you say how are you, we will use hvordan, right?
    Exactly!

    den and det:
    soo I use det only for humans, otherwise with subjects and actions I use den, did I get it right?
    No, not really. It's the other way round, like I said previously:
    when we're dealing with higher living beings (like humans) we use den

    for now I think I don't have any questions, but tomorrow when I read your posts again I may ask something more, hehe
    Bring it on And it's really no big deal, I'm just glad I can help

    ahmm also, if it's not a problem can you please edit the posts where you made a typing mistake, 'cause when I read again the post I may forget that you said that it's otherwise
    I was actually also gonna do that, I just got totally distracted (because of someone ) and forgot all about it sorry But no problem, it'll be done byyyy... now!

  25. #38
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    hehe skal nok gøre mit bedste , men synes det er svært at lærer andre sprog , især når det er et sprog man i forvejen selv har svært ved dansk er nok ikke lige det nemmeste sprog .. men nu når de vil lærer det må vi jo gøre vores bedste hehe .. i know its really disturbing when someone talk a language that you dont understand soo , i wanna tell you guys .. Me and PlainChaos just talked about how difficult it is to learn other peoble a language that is so difficult that you barely even understand it yourself But anyways we will do our best ...
    Niye yaptığına dair tek bir neden söyleyebilir misin bana?

  26. #39
    Senior Member velvet_sky's Avatar
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    Hey PlainChaos thanks a lot

    so here I have a question.
    Well as you said in past participle we always have to use one of the three verbs (have, to be, stay) and you said when we have a main verb vere we use have/har, when we have blive we use vere/er... but when the main verb is have/har what should I use ? vere or blive? and also when the main verb is different from those, how can I find out which of these three to put in front of them

    ~ Can you write how is my, your, his, her, their, its, our
    also good, wrong

    Tose Proeski - The Hardest Thing --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKRrADJ7j3E
    * Agapi mou gurna pisw, Mou Leipeis... :[

  27. #40
    PlainChaos
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    Quote Originally Posted by velvet_sky View Post
    Well as you said in past participle we always have to use one of the three verbs (have, to be, stay) and you said when we have a main verb vere we use have/har, when we have blive we use vere/er...
    Yup, that's right!

    but when the main verb is have/har what should I use ? vere or blive?
    That's a good question, the answer is none of them! I know this might sound strange (and yes Danish really is a weird language), but we use have in front of have in past principial.

    The conjugation of the verb have looks like this:

    Present: har
    Past: havde
    Past principial: har haft

    and also when the main verb is different from those, how can I find out which of these three to put in front of them
    Well, this is the hard part of it, there's no rule or anything, but we mainly use har, some verbs are irregular and cause a lot of trouble, but when you're in doubt I'd say you should just use har.

    ~ Can you write how is my, your, his, her, their, its, our
    also good, wrong
    Yup, those are the possessive pronouns, we're gonna take them next

    Good! = Godt!
    Wrong = Forkert

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